Sentence Castle, Templeton

Has been described as a Certain Timber Castle (Ringwork)

There are earthwork remains

NameSentence Castle, Templeton
Alternative NamesArberth; Narberth; Nereberd
Historic CountryPembrokeshire
Modern AuthorityPembrokeshire
1974 AuthorityDyfed
CommunityTempleton

Embanked ringwork enclosure, about 15m internal diameter, set within a formerly waterlogged ditched, that expands to about 15m across on the east, suggesting a former pond. (Coflein)

Known as Sentence Camp. Tradition goes that the Templars held a court on this camp, hence the name. ("Templeton owes its name to the fact of its having the Pembrokeshire home of the Knights Templars, being a branch from Templecombe, Somerset. The Templars were probably established here 1150-80, and their lands passed to the Hospitallers of Slebech about 1333". J. Roger Rees).

Sentence Camp is an earthen castle with a ditch round it, such as were used both by Welsh and Normans just before stone castles were built. (Laws and Owen 1908)

Gatehouse Comments

Has been claimed as the original castle of Narberth, though this is speculation. Appears to have functioned as a manorial centre for the Knights Templars, who held the manor. History has been confused with Narberth.

- Philip Davis

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

Not Listed

The National Monument Record (Coflein) number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceSN110116
Latitude51.7715492248535
Longitude-4.73943996429443
Eastings211060
Northings211640
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Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved

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Books

  • Purton, P.F., 2009, A History of the Early Medieval Siege c. 450-1220 (Woodbridge: The Boydell Press) p. 264
  • Morgan, Gerald, 2008, Castles in Wales: A Handbook (Talybont: Y Lolfa Cyf.) p. 248 (listed)
  • Hull, Lise, 2005, Castles and Bishops Palaces of Pembrokeshire (Logaston Press) p. 205-6
  • Pettifer, Adrian, 2000, Welsh Castles, A Guide by Counties (Boydell Press) p. 166
  • Davis, Paul, 2000, A Company of Forts. A Guide to the Medieval Castles of West Wales (Gomer Press) p. 41
  • Reid, Alan, 1998, Castles of Wales (John Jones Publishing) p. 131
  • Salter, Mike, 1996, The Castles of South West Wales (Malvern) p. 87 (slight)
  • Miles, Dillwyn, 1979 (Revised 1988), Castles of Pembrokeshire (Pembrokeshire Coast National Park) p. 5-7
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 2 p. 395
  • Fry, P.S., 1980, Castles of the British Isles (David and Charles) p. 367
  • Stickings, T.G., 1973, Castles and Strongholds of Pembrokeshire (Tenby) p. 67
  • Renn, D.F., 1973 (2 edn.), Norman Castles of Britain (London: John Baker) p. 251
  • Rees, Wm, 1932, Map of South Wales and the Border in the 14th century (Ordnance Survey) (A handbook to the map was published in 1933)
  • RCAHMW, 1925, An inventory of the Ancient Monuments of Pembrokeshire (HMSO) p. 252 no. 748 online copy
  • Armitage, Ella, 1912, The Early Norman Castles of the British Isles (London: John Murray) p. 280 online copy
  • Laws, E. and Owen, H., 1908, Archaeological Survey of Pembrokeshire 1896-1907 (Tenby)

Journals

  • Hogg, A.H.A. and King, D.J.C., 1967, 'Masonry castles in Wales and the Marches: a list' Archaeologia Cambrensis Vol. 116 p. 71-132
  • King, D.J.C. and Alcock, L., 1969, 'Ringworks in England and Wales' Château Gaillard Vol. 3 p. 90-127
  • Hogg, A.H.A. and King, D.J.C., 1963, 'Early castles in Wales and the Marches: a preliminary list' Archaeologia Cambrensis Vol. 112 p. 77-124

Primary Sources

  • Brut y Tywysogion 1116, 1215, 1220, c1257 (Several transcriptions and translations exist the best being Jones, T., 1952, Brut Y Twysogion (University of Wales, History and Law series 11)–based on the Peniarth MS 20 version. There is a flawed translation Williams ab Ithel, John, 1860, Brut Y Twysogion or The Chronicle of the Princes (Rolls Series) online copy)
  • Williams (ab Ithel), John, (ed), 1860, Annales Cambriae (444 – 1288) (London: Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts)1220 online copy
  • Maxwell Lyte, H.C. (ed), 1901, Calendar of Patent Rolls Henry III (1216-25) Vol. 1 p. 255 online copy