Castell Mael, Puncheston

Has been described as a Possible Timber Castle (Ringwork)

There are earthwork remains

NameCastell Mael, Puncheston
Alternative NamesCastell Moel; Punchesterton
Historic CountryPembrokeshire
Modern AuthorityPembrokeshire
1974 AuthorityDyfed
CommunityPuncheston

This is a horse-shoe shaped work standing immediately east of the parish church, and on the parish boundary, near the river Anghof which skirts the steep slope that forms the defence to the east. It is protected by a much- disturbed rampart which, rising at its best to 6 feet, falls about 12 feet to a ditch that now is largely filled in. The summit of the slope may have carried a mound of which faint traces may be detected. The length of the slope is about 220 feet; the rock has been scarped in places. The entrance was midway in the rampart; it has been ruined. A school-house has been erected within the enclosed area. (RCAHMW, 1925)

Castell Mael is an oval enclosure, measuring c.84m NE-SW by 58m. It occupies a promontory above a stream confluence, resting on steep scarps except on the east, where the entrance is set in a single bank. (Coflein)

Gatehouse Comments

Large ringwork and, therefore, a possible Iron Age fort in origin - although this does not exclude medieval reuse of the site. King writes "Partial ringwork of a large area at the junction of two valleys. A foundation of boulders on the top of the bank."

- Philip Davis

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

Not Listed

The National Monument Record (Coflein) number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceSN009298
Latitude51.9306297302246
Longitude-4.89613008499146
Eastings200900
Northings229800
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved

Most of the sites or buildings recorded in this web site are NOT open to the public and permission to visit a site must always be sought from the landowner or tenant.

Calculate Print

Books

  • Morgan, Gerald, 2008, Castles in Wales: A Handbook (Talybont: Y Lolfa Cyf.) p. 247, 257 (listed twice)
  • Hull, Lise, 2005, Castles and Bishops Palaces of Pembrokeshire (Logaston Press) p. 188
  • Pettifer, Adrian, 2000, Welsh Castles, A Guide by Counties (Boydell Press) p. 178
  • Davis, Paul, 2000, A Company of Forts. A Guide to the Medieval Castles of West Wales (Gomer Press) p. 40
  • Salter, Mike, 1996, The Castles of South West Wales (Malvern) p. 87 (slight)
  • Miles, Dillwyn, 1979 (Revised 1988), Castles of Pembrokeshire (Pembrokeshire Coast National Park) p. 5-7
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 2 p. 396
  • RCAHMW, 1925, An inventory of the Ancient Monuments of Pembrokeshire (HMSO) p. 299 no. 872 online copy
  • Lewis, Samual, 1849, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales online copy

Journals

  • King, D.J.C. and Alcock, L., 1969, 'Ringworks in England and Wales' Ch√Ęteau Gaillard Vol. 3 p. 90-127
  • Hogg, A.H.A. and King, D.J.C., 1963, 'Early castles in Wales and the Marches: a preliminary list' Archaeologia Cambrensis Vol. 112 p. 77-124