Llanquian Castle

Has been described as a Certain Timber Castle (Ringwork), and also as a Certain Masonry Castle

There are masonry footings remains

NameLlanquian Castle
Alternative Names
Historic CountryGlamorgan
Modern AuthorityVale of Glamorgan
1974 AuthoritySouth Glamorgan
CommunityCowbridge With Llanblethian

The castle at Llanquian is thought to have originated in the twelfth century and was subsequently re-built in stone in the thirteenth. A mound, c.32.5m in diameter, showing traces of a ditch has, upon its summit, a partial bank thought to mask an oval stone wall, c.18-20m in diameter. A rectangular stone building, 9.5m northwest to south-east by 8.0m, projects from the north-west of the summit. (Coflein)

The earth and stone mound measures 30.0m in diameter at the base, and is up to 2.0m in height. The slightly dished summit is 20.0m in diameter. Llanquian Castle is situated on the western side of a valley which provided a natural defence. the remains consist of a circular stony and grass covered mound which averaged 20.0m in diameter and 2.0m high. The top is flat excepting a small mound of castle and stone on the N perimeter of the site, which may represent tumbled walling. there is a fragment of ditch 10.0m long and 0.5m deep on the ne of the site; there are no traces of any continuation around the earthwork, whose circular plan suggests that the original structure was in the nature of a round tower. There are no outer defensive works. The only masonry visible is a building of apparently much later date which has been constructed and cut back into the west side of the castle, which which must be the gatehouse referred to by Clark (see source 02). (Quinnell 1956; OS Record Card) Llanguian Castle is situated upon a spur, overlooking valleys to the north, east and south east. The earth and stone mound measures 30.0m in diameter at the base, and is up to 2.0m in height. The slightly dished summit is 20.0m in diameter. There are remains of a stone bank around the permimeter on the west and south. An outer ditch is best preserved on the north-east, where it is 6.0m in width, and 1.0m in depth. It reduces to a 3.0m wide berm on the south-east, and there are further traces of the ditch on the south west and west

Cut into the north-west side of the mound is a stone building, 7.5m square, of which the south and east walls stand to 0.6m height. There is a doorway, 1.0m wide in the south side, against the south-east corner. The building, probably a farm building of later date, has an extension to the west over a filled-in stretch of the moat. Represented by stone footings, it is 8.0m long, and is open to the south. On the east-north-east side of the summit of the mound is a heap of stone and earth, measuring 8.0m by 5.0m, and 1.0m in height. It is possibly fallen masonry, but is more likely a spoil heap, perhaps clearance of the stone bank from the north and east sides of the summit. 50.0m to the south-west are foundation remains of two stone huts at right angles to one another, where 13th century sherds have been found. They are as described on ST 07 SW 6. Complex surveyed at 1:2500 on MSD. (ASP 1982; OS Record Card) (Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust HER)

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

Not Listed

The National Monument Record (Coflein) number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceST018744
Latitude51.4598083496094
Longitude-3.41386008262634
Eastings301890
Northings174440
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved

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Books

  • Davis, Paul, R., 2011, The Forgotten Castles of Wales (Almeley: Logaston Press) p. 101-108
  • Morgan, Gerald, 2008, Castles in Wales: A Handbook (Talybont: Y Lolfa Cyf.) p. 239 (listed)
  • Pettifer, Adrian, 2000, Welsh Castles, A Guide by Counties (Boydell Press) p. 111
  • Reid, Alan, 1998, Castles of Wales (John Jones Publishing) p. 99
  • < >RCAHMW, 1991, An Inventory of the Ancient Monuments in Glamorgan Vol. 3 Part 1a: The Early Castles (London: HMSO) < > MR3 p. 263-5
  • Salter, Mike, 1991, The Castles of Gwent, Glamorgan and Gower (Malvern) p. 54
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 1 p. 165
  • Davis, Paul R., 1983, Castles of Glamorgan (Alun Books) p. 46
  • Fry, P.S., 1980, Castles of the British Isles (David and Charles) p. 362
  • Hague, D.B., 1971, in Pugh, T.B. (ed), Glamorgan County History Vol. 3 The Middle Ages (Cardiff) p. 442
  • Clark, G.T., 1884, Mediaeval Military Architecture in England  (Wyman and Sons) Vol. 2 p. 201-3 (reprint of 1872 Arch. Camb. article) online copy

Journals

  • Spurgeon, Jack, 1987, 'The Castles of Glamorgan' Château Gaillard Vol. 13 p. 209n, 222
  • Spurgeon, C.J. and Thomas, H.J.,1980, 'Llanquian Castle, Llanblethian', Archaeology in Wales Vol. 20 p. 6
  • Spurgeon, C.J. and Thomas, H.J., 1978, 'Medieval Glamorgan' Morgannwg Vol. 22 p. 22 online copy
  • Hogg, A.H.A. and King, D.J.C., 1967, 'Masonry castles in Wales and the Marches: a list' Archaeologia Cambrensis Vol. 116 p. 71-132
  • Hogg, A.H.A. and King, D.J.C., 1963, 'Early castles in Wales and the Marches: a preliminary list' Archaeologia Cambrensis Vol. 112 p. 77-124
  • Clark, G.T., 1872, 'The Tower of Llanquian' Archaeologia Cambrensis Vol. 27 p. 144-6 online copy