Bovehill Castle, Landimore

Has been described as a Certain Fortified Manor House

There are masonry ruins/remnants remains

NameBovehill Castle, Landimore
Alternative NamesCheriton; Landymore; Landimor
Historic CountryGlamorgan
Modern AuthoritySwansea
1974 AuthorityWest Glamorgan
CommunityLlangennith, Llanmadoc and Cheriton

Landimor Castle (Bovehill Castle) was built in the late-15th century by Sir Hugh Johnys within the manor granted to him in the ancient but defunct Gower fee of Landimor. Mansion, thought to have been constructed after 1451, neglected from 1500 & derelict by 1666. Ruinous remains of mansion, 57m N-S by 28m, resting on steep slopes to the E; a relatively substantial wall, with at least one turret at its N angle, defines a court on the W side of the mansion, the whole being 57m E-W by 50m. There is a tradition of water being piped into the castle from Leaden Pipe Well, 1km to the SW (RCAHMW 2000, SH1 444-8) OS County series (1879) depicts a 29m stretch of NE-SW wall, c.45m NW of the castle, with features that appear to represent the NW end of a NW-SE range, 7.3m across; possibly anciliary buildings associated with the mansion. (Coflein)

A ruined 15th or 16th century stone built fortified manor house, the eastern wall of which forms the boundary of National Trust property. The house itself is set at the top of a steep slope overlooking Landimore and the marsh. The surviving walls are approximately 5m high and 1m thick. The surviving masonry forms part of a large rectangular enclosure with the remains of various buildings ranged against the inner walls. A great wall crosses the enclosure dividing it into two. The site had a lofty central hall with storeyed rooms at either end. Flanking turrets on the Southeast corner contained guarderobes. A renovated and occupied 19th century cottage (GGAT SMR no. 01727w) currently occupies the site of the gatehouse at the northern end. The foundations of an outer enclosure with corner turrets can apparently be traced in the field to the west. The boundary wall is built of mortared dressed stone with a rubble core and is partly covered in ivy and hidden by trees, much of the facing stone has been removed and is held together in places by the ivy

The interior of the house lies outside Trust property and was not examined. The site is first mentioned in the possession of Llewellyn ap Iorwerth, Prince of North Wales, 1195-1240, who gave it to a chieftain named Morgan Gam. The actual house appears to have been built by Sir Hugh Johnnys, granted the land in 1451, who rebuilt and enlarged the site in the 15th century. Sir Hugh also supposedly fed the house with water brought in via a lead pipe from a spring on Ryer's Down (NT89278), traces of which could still be seen by Davies in the late 19th century. (Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust HER)

Sir Hugh Jonys, who was knighted at Jerusalem in 1440, became the Knight Marshall of England. He was granted the manor by John, Duke of Norfolk, Lord of Gower, is said to have had a fortified manor house here, but the thinly walled ruined domestic ranges set on a shelf above the Landimore marshes are of the time of Sir Rhys ap Thomas or a still later owner. The ruins, much overgrown and difficult to find are located on what today is called "Bovehill Farm." (www.castlewales.com)

Gatehouse Comments

King lists as vanished castle and writes mentioned 1396, dismissing existing ruins as completely non-military in nature.

- Philip Davis

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

Not Listed

The National Monument Record (Coflein) number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceSS464932
Latitude51.6169700622559
Longitude-4.21962976455688
Eastings246430
Northings193230
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved

Most of the sites or buildings recorded in this web site are NOT open to the public and permission to visit a site must always be sought from the landowner or tenant.

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Books

  • Davis, Paul, R., 2011, The Forgotten Castles of Wales (Almeley: Logaston Press) p. 117-18
  • RCAHMW, 2000, An Inventory of Ancient Monuments in Glamorgan Vol III Part lb: The Later Castles from 1217 to the present (HMSO) SH1 p. 444-8
  • Reid, Alan, 1998, Castles of Wales (John Jones Publishing) p. 31
  • Salter, Mike, 1991, The Castles of Gwent, Glamorgan and Gower (Malvern) p. 65
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 1 p. 171
  • Hague, D.B., 1971, in Pugh, T.B. (ed), Glamorgan County History Vol. 3 The Middle Ages (Cardiff) p. 438
  • Lewis, Samual, 1849, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales online copy

Journals

  • Spurgeon, C.J. and Thomas, H.J., 1978, 'Medieval Glamorgan' Morgannwg Vol. 22 p. 26 online copy
  • Hogg, A.H.A. and King, D.J.C., 1967, 'Masonry castles in Wales and the Marches: a list' Archaeologia Cambrensis Vol. 116 p. 71-132

Primary Sources

  • Clark, G.T., 1910, Cartae et alia munimenta quae ad dominium de Glamorgancia pertinent Vol. 4 p. 1391 online copy