Barry Castle

Has been described as a Certain Timber Castle (Ringwork), and also as a Certain Masonry Castle, and also as a Fortified Manor House

There are masonry ruins/remnants remains

NameBarry Castle
Alternative Names
Historic CountryGlamorgan
Modern AuthorityVale of Glamorgan
1974 AuthoritySouth Glamorgan
CommunityBarry

Ruins of a defensible mansion, built in two stages from c.1300 through to the early C14, possibly within/on the site of an earlier (C12?) castle ringwork. First mentioned when derelict in the 1530's. Three main blocks, joined by lengths of curtain wall appear to have defined a quadrangular court, c.30m N-S by 28m overall. The gatehouse, in the SE angle, used for manorial courts, 1600-1720, is the best preserved part. (Coflein)

Fortified manor established here by C12, but remains date from circa 1300-1350. Consisted of 3 blocks arranged round courtyard; with gateway at SE angle.

Local rubble with some remaining freestone dressings. Remains consist of gateway (circa 5m high) with pointed arch (chamfered voussoirs and hoodmould) and window opening above. Portcullis grooves to sides of gateway. Wall to L of gateway steps forward. Remains of 2 walls run to W of gateway (former hall block with basement below); arched doorway and slit window in rear wall (circa 2.2m high); S wall is foundations only (circa 7m long). To rear of gateway, E wall has slit window, blocked stair to SE corner. (Listed Building Report)

There is evidence that the castle occupies the site of a Romano-British farmstead. The surviving remains consist of the vestiges of three buildings which formed the south an east sides of a small quadrangular court entered at the SE angle. There is evidence for another building on the west side, and for a tower at the SW angle, both now vanished. The castle is certainly of Norman foundation; traces of hearths and pits associated with 12th century potsherds were brought to light during clearance work in the 1960s. Moreover, the circular enclosure portrayed on an estate map of 1622 may indicate a primary castle-ringwork here, like those converted to stone at nearby Sully and Penmark

The stone East building was raised in the 13th century, possibly by Lucas de Barry, while the more extensive south range (which comprised a hall and a gatehouse) was probably the work of John de Barry who held the manor for most of the first half of the 14th century. (Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust HER)

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

This is a Grade 2* listed building protected by law

Historic Wales CADW listed database record number
The National Monument Record (Coflein) number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceST100672
Latitude51.3966217041016
Longitude-3.29380011558533
Eastings310080
Northings167200
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Copyright Philip Blayney All rights reserved.
Copyright Philip Blayney All rights reserved.
Copyright Philip Blayney All rights reserved.
Copyright Philip Blayney All rights reserved.
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved

Most of the sites or buildings recorded in this web site are NOT open to the public and permission to visit a site must always be sought from the landowner or tenant.

Calculate Print

Books

  • Kenyon, John, 2010, The Medieval Castles of Wales (University of Wales Press) p. 96-97
  • Morgan, Gerald, 2008, Castles in Wales: A Handbook (Talybont: Y Lolfa Cyf.) p. 238 (listed)
  • < >RCAHMW, 2000, An Inventory of Ancient Monuments in Glamorgan Vol. 3 Part 1b: The Later Castles (London: HMSO) < > p. 22-32
  • Pettifer, Adrian, 2000, Welsh Castles, A Guide by Counties (Boydell Press) p. 81
  • Reid, Alan, 1998, Castles of Wales (John Jones Publishing) p. 28
  • Salter, Mike, 1991, The Castles of Gwent, Glamorgan and Gower (Malvern) p. 38
  • Thomas, H.J., 1988 (2nd revised edn) ‘Castle, church and village: medieval Barry, 1100–1500’, in Moore, D. (ed), Barry: the centenary book (Barry: Barry Centenary Book Committee) p. 56–99
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 1 p. 160
  • Davis, Paul R., 1983, Castles of Glamorgan (Alun Books) p. 42-3
  • Hague, D.B., 1971, in Pugh, T.B. (ed), Glamorgan County History Vol. 3 The Middle Ages (Cardiff) p. 437
  • Lewis, Samual, 1849, A Topographical Dictionary of Wales online copy

Antiquarian

  • Toulmin-Smith, Lucy (ed), 1906, Leland's Itinerary in Wales  (Bell and Sons; London) p. 23-4 online copy

Journals

  • Thomas, H.J., 1983, ‘Barry Castle’ 130th annual meeting, Vale of Glamorgan, 1983: programme, CAA p. 17–18
  • Spurgeon, C.J. and Thomas, H.J., 1978, 'Medieval Glamorgan' Morgannwg Vol. 22 p. 21 online copy
  • Hogg, A.H.A. and King, D.J.C., 1967, 'Masonry castles in Wales and the Marches: a list' Archaeologia Cambrensis Vol. 116 p. 71-132
  • Hurst, D. Gillian, 1966, 'Medieval Britain in 1965: II Post-conquest' Medieval Archaeology Vol. 10 p. 194 download copy