Hardwick New Hall

Has been described as a Possible Fortified Manor House

There are major building remains

NameHardwick New Hall
Alternative Names
Historic CountryDerbyshire
Modern AuthorityDerbyshire
1974 AuthorityDerbyshire
Civil ParishAult Hucknall

Walls and lodges enclosing the gardens in two rectangular enclosures. 1590-97 probably by Robert Smythson. Sandstone ashlar. Chamfered copings surmounted by unusual finials forming a kind of crenellation. Polygonal lodge to the west and triangular bastion-like banqueting house. The entrance has a chamfered round-arch and square tower-like central section. Polygonal finials and elaborate strapwork cresting. (Listed Building Report)

The high stone wall that defines the court to Hardwick New Hall in Derbyshire is punctuated by beaked towers and crowned by curious obelisk and strapwork projections, a fashionable alternative to battlements. The idea at Hardwick may in fact be lifted from the towered gatehouse set in the main facade of Chatsworth, built by Bess and her first husband, Sir William Cavendish, from 1549. (Goodall, p. 459)

Gatehouse Comments

Since the Old Hall was in use as ancillary accommodation to the New Hall and is outside the boundary wall the man function of that wall was to define high status social space. However, this can also be said of a great number of crenellated precinct walls of earlier medieval buildings which are very often described as 'fortifications'.

- Philip Davis

Not scheduled

This is a Grade 2 listed building protected by law

Historic England Scheduled Monument Number
Historic England Listed Building number(s)
Images Of England
Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceSK462637
Latitude53.1689109802246
Longitude-1.30992996692657
Eastings446229
Northings363746
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved

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Books

  • Goodall, John, 2011, The English Castle 1066-1650 (Yale University Press) p. 442, 459, 461, 476, 477
  • Craven, Maxwell and Stanley, Michael, 2001, The Derbyshire Country House (Landmark Publishing) Vol. 1 p. 110-13
  • Cooper, Nicholas, 1999, Houses of the Gentry, 1480-1680 (Yale University Press) passim
  • Girouard, Mark, 1983, Robert Smythson and the Elizabethan Country House (Yale University Press)
  • Pevsner, Nikolaus revised by Elizabeth Williamson, 1978, Buildings of England: Derbyshire (Harmondsworth) p. 150-5
  • Pevsner, N., 1953, The Buildings of England: Derbyshire p. 41, 149-55
  • Lysons, D. and S., 1817, Magna Britannia Vol. 5 Derbyshire p. ccxxxviii-ix online transcription

Journals

  • 1980, The Archaeological Journal Vol. 137 p. 437-40
  • Stallybrass, B., 1913, 'Bess of Hardwick's buildings and building accounts' Archaeologia Vol. 64 p. 347-398
  • 1873, The Antiquary Vol. 62 p. 217-9