Thorpe Hall, Thorpe Salvin

Has been described as a Possible Fortified Manor House

There are masonry ruins/remnants remains

NameThorpe Hall, Thorpe Salvin
Alternative NamesThorpe Salvin Hall
Historic CountryYorkshire
Modern AuthorityRotherham
1974 AuthoritySouth Yorkshire
Civil ParishThorpe Salvin

Ruins of the mansion rebuilt in the mid-late 16th century for Hercy Sandford. In addition to the gatehouse the three-storey, nine-bay symmetrical south wall of the courtyard-plan mansion survives, the wall having round corner turrets, projections for external stacks and a central porch. The bases of the rear corner turrets survive, that on the right is linked by a section of plinth wall. The ruins are of limestone rubble. (PastScape)

Ruined mansion. Mid-late C16. For Hercy Sandford (d1582). Rubble limestone, no roof. 3-storey, 9-bay symmetrical south wall of courtyard-plan mansion having round corner turrets, projections for external stacks and central porch; bases of rear corner turrets survive, that on right linked by section of plinth wall. In Tudor domestic style with transomed, ovolo-moulded mullioned windows mostly of 3 lights. Large quoins, chamfered plinth. Central porch projection has doorway with double-chamfered surround and Tudor-arched lintel with hoodmould; blocked 3-light mullioned window over has hoodmould. Transomed 1st-floor window with hoodmould now has wooden pigeon holes; transomed 2nd-floor window beneath dripcourse. 3 bays to each side have blind central stack projections surmounted by sections of mulled friezes and with diagonally-set stack plinths; bay 2 collapsed above ground floor. Turret at left end ruined, that on right intact and with windows set on the curve, 2nd-floor window without mullions, string course beneath rebuilt parapet. Right return: plinth remains and has projection for stop-chamfered doorway; base of turret on right. Left return: base of rear turret with chamfered square-headed doorway attached. Interior: rear of facade has large ground-floor fireplaces of which the relieving arches remain; triangular- headed fireplaces to upper floors. Heraldic panels on the gatehouse (q.v.) point to the date of construction being 1565-82. The building was sold to Sir Edward Osborne in 1636

His successor Thomas Osborne, Earl of Danby lived there until after his marriage; he became Charles II's chief minister and was created Duke of Leeds in 1694 after which time the family moved to Kiveton Park. (Listed Building Report)

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

This is a Grade 2* listed building protected by law

Historic England Scheduled Monument Number
Historic England Listed Building number(s)
Images Of England
Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceSK521812
Latitude53.3259696960449
Longitude-1.21878004074097
Eastings452139
Northings381266
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Copyright Roger Perriss All Rights Reserved
Copyright Roger Perriss All Rights Reserved
Copyright Roger Perriss All Rights Reserved
Copyright Roger Perriss All Rights Reserved
Copyright Roger Perriss All Rights Reserved
Copyright Roger Perriss All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved

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Books

  • Goodall, John, 2011, The English Castle 1066-1650 (Yale University Press) p. 458
  • Hey, David, 2003, Medieval South Yorkshire (Landmark Publishing) p. 89
  • Cooper, Nicholas, 1999, Houses of the Gentry, 1480-1680 (Yale University Press) p. 143, 145, 146-7
  • Girouard, Mark, 1983, Robert Smythson and the Elizabethan Country House (Yale University Press) p. 119- 20
  • Pevsner, N. Revised by Enid Radcliffe, 1967, Buildings of England: Yorkshire: West Riding (London, Penguin) p. 515
  • Ambler, L., 1913, The old halls and manor houses of Yorkshire, with some examples of other houses built before the year 1700 (London: Batsford) p. 53 online copy
  • Hunter, J., 1831, South Yorkshire. The History and Topography of the Deanery of Doncaster in the Diocese and County of York p. 310

Journals

  • Innocent, C.F., 1925-1928, Transactions of the Hunter Archaeological Society Vol. 3.3 p. 223-8
  • 1905 July, Building News and Engineering Journal Vol. 89 (measured drawings)

Other

  • Historic England, 2015, Heritage at Risk Yorkshire Register 2015 (London: Historic England) p. 80 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2014, Heritage at Risk Register 2014 Yorkshire (London: English Heritage) p. 91 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2013, Heritage at Risk Register 2013 Yorkshire (London: English Heritage) p. 95 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2012, Heritage at Risk Register 2012 Yorkshire and the Humber (London: English Heritage) p. 115 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2011, Heritage at Risk Register 2011 Yorkshire and the Humber (London: English Heritage) p. 107 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2010, Heritage at Risk Register 2010 Yorkshire and the Humber (London: English Heritage) p. 111 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2009, Heritage at Risk Register 2009 Yorkshire and the Humber (London: English Heritage) p. 120 online copy