Brigham Church of St Bridget

Has been described as a Questionable Fortified Ecclesiastical site

There are major building remains

NameBrigham Church of St Bridget
Alternative Names
Historic CountryCumberland
Modern AuthorityCumbria
1974 AuthorityCumbria
Civil ParishBrigham

The church is early Norman (circa 1070) with 12th to 14th century additions. 3-bay nave and south aisle with square 3-storey west tower and south porch. There were severe restorations in 1865-76 by William Butterfield. A 10th or 11th century crosshead is at the vicarage and other cross fragments of 8th-11th century date, and a 10th century hogback fragment, are in the church. A bronze ring-headed pin of Viking type, was found in the foundations of the tower. (PastScape)

Parish Church. Late C11 with C12, C13 and C14 additions and alterations; restoration 1864-76 by William Butterfield. Calciferous sandstone ashlar, under graduated greenslate roof with coped gables, cross finials and shaped ridge tiles. 3-bay nave and south aisle with square 3-storey west tower and south porch. 2-bay chancel with north vestry. Nave has blocked north doorway under round-headed niche. C19 2-light windows. Aisle has buttressed wall with C14 windows, that in west wall almond shaped and that in east wall 5-light, all with heavily restored tracery. Circa 1390 porch has pointed arch and hoodmould. Tower has blocked C14 west door under 2-light ogee-headed window; 2-light bell openings and 1876 gabled roof. South and east chancel walls have been partly rebuilt in C19, but the lower courses retain on the south a small rectangular window and blocked priest's doorway; 3-light window retaining some of its original C13 tracery. 5-light replica C13 east window. Vestry has reused 2-light window with C13 tracery. Interior: C13 font. 3-bay aisle of round arches on round columns with waterleaf capitals. 1876 painted timber ceiling. Medieval cross slab built into north wall. Aisle piscina, sedilia and tomb recess for vicar Thomas de Burgh 1348; east window has flanking statue niches. Various sculptured fragments from the medieval and earlier church. Pointed tower arch and vaulted lower chamber. Newel staircase in thickness of wall angle. Medieval cross slab built into blocked west door

Wall plaques to Langton family of Cockermouth. Pointed chancel arch. Chancel has C19 painted timber ceiling. C19 aumbry recess. Unsigned C19 carved white-marble wall plaque to Ann Mary Morris. C19 furnishings and fittings; C19 stained glass by Cox & Buckley and Sons, 1870 and by Alexander Gibbs, 1865. (Listed Building Report)

Gatehouse Comments

The church tower is strongly built with an exceptional narrow and steep stair which, accord to Brooke, makes it defensible, although such stairs are, in fact, not that uncommon in churches. The church tower is tunnel vaulted and this does make the bell tower a little more 'defensible' than usual although it is arguably if this really makes the church different from other parish churches in other parts of England.

- Philip Davis

Not scheduled

This is a Grade 1 listed building protected by law

Historic England Scheduled Monument Number
Historic England Listed Building number(s)
Images Of England
Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceNY085309
Latitude54.6650390625
Longitude-3.418869972229
Eastings308580
Northings530920
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Copyright Richie B All Rights Reserved

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Books

  • Brooke, C.J., 2000, Safe Sanctuaries (Edinburgh: John Donald) p. 299-301