Ingmire Hall, Sedbergh

Has been described as a Possible Pele Tower

There are masonry ruins/remnants remains

NameIngmire Hall, Sedbergh
Alternative Names
Historic CountryYorkshire
Modern AuthorityCumbria
1974 AuthorityCumbria
Civil ParishSedbergh

Remains of a C16 (in part possibly earlier) mansion with pele tower, altered and enlarged in the early C19 by George Webster of Kendal; extended c1900; partially destroyed by fire in the 1920s and extended again and partially remodelled in 1989. Coursed rubble with quoins, slate roofs. PLAN/EXTERIOR: the pre-C19 building appears to have consisted of a pele (at the N end), a hall range, and a crosswing (at the S end). The pele is internally ruinous; the hall has disappeared but the site was marked by Webster with a crenellated curtain wall which connects pele and wing and enhances its "medieval aspect". Generally 2 storeys, with attic to wing. The pele has a tall 3-stage cylindrical stair-turret at the NW corner, with slit windows and a high corbelled-out parapet with stepped crenellation; a slit window at ground floor, a 3-light mullioned window with a hoodmould at 1st floor, and a high embattled parapet with another slit window and a corbelled diagonal south-west corner. Its north side has (inter alia) 2 chamfered doorways of different heights and arch profiles. To the south extends Webster's curtain wall, which is symmetrical and vigorously articulated with high stepped crenellation flanking a large canted corbelled turret rising from a canted pier in the centre, and buttresses at ground floor flanked by 1- and 2-light windows. The crosswing is now the main house, an irregular 2-window range with central and angle buttresses, cross-windows, a 3-light mullioned window in the gable and a mock turret at the NW corner. Attached to the south-west corner, and overlapping it slightly, is the front end of a buttressed gabled porch with an arched doorway and obelisk-and-ball finials, which has been rebuilt and extended to the rear. Ridge chimney with clustered diagonal shafts. The south side of the wing, 2:3 windows in 2 builds, is irregular, with various coupled and 1-light sashes, and gablets with similar finials. Late C20 alterations to rear

INTERIOR not inspected but the crosswing, although considerably altered by Webster, appears to contain much early work. Set back behind courtyard to N is the stable block and cottage, L-plan, and medievalised by Webster with a "gatehouse" which dominates the main range: a wide bay with octagonal corner turrets flanking a wide 4-centred arch above which is a 3-light mullioned window. The lower side ranges appear to incorporate earlier fabric but are much altered; and attached at the north end is a single-storey 3-bay arcaded cart-shed. (Listed Building Report)

The remains of a 16th century house, possibly incorporating parts of an earlier building, with a pele tower. The mansion was enlarged in the early 19th century and extended again circa 1900. It was partially destroyed by fire in the 1920s and extended again and partially remodelled in 1989. The pre-19th century plan consisted of a central hall range flanked by a pele tower and a cross wing. The hall has since been demolished and replaced by a castellated curtain wall. (PastScape)

Not scheduled

This is a Grade 2 listed building protected by law

Historic England Scheduled Monument Number
Historic England Listed Building number(s)
Images Of England
Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceSD637918
Latitude54.3206901550293
Longitude-2.55920004844666
Eastings363732
Northings491807
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Photograph by Matthew Emmott. All rights reserved
Photograph by Matthew Emmott. All rights reserved
Photograph by Matthew Emmott. All rights reserved
Photograph by Matthew Emmott. All rights reserved
Photograph by Matthew Emmott. All rights reserved
Photograph by Matthew Emmott. All rights reserved

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Books

  • Perriam, Denis and Robinson, John, 1998, The Medieval Fortified Buildings of Cumbria (Kendal: CWAAS Extra Series 29) p. 395

Journals

  • 1994 Sept, Sedbergh Historian Newsletter
  • 1998, Sedbergh Historian Vol. 2.1

Other

  • English Heritage, 2006, Extensive Urban Survey - Cumbria (Cumbria County Council) Download copy