Bincknoll Castle, Broad Hinton

Has been described as a Certain Timber Castle (Motte)

There are earthwork remains

NameBincknoll Castle, Broad Hinton
Alternative Names
Historic CountryWiltshire
Modern AuthorityWiltshire
1974 AuthorityWiltshire
Civil ParishBroad Hinton

Enigmatic earthworks, previously identified as a motte and bailey castle with evidence of a settlement within the outer bailey. Now considered to be more probably of Iron Age origin, though with medieval and/or later elements. The 'motte', severely mutilated by quarrying, measures 52 metres in diameter by 3.2 metres high, and its ditch is 2.3 metres deep. The inner enclosure has a bank and ditch 3.4 metres high dividing it from the outer enclosure, with a causeway entrance. There is evidence of settlement, agricultural activity and later quarrying within the bailey. (PastScape)

A strong little fortress with one inner and two outer wards; plentiful rude pottery found under the soil. (Maskelyne 1887)

Listed as medieval, enclosing an area of 3 1/2 acres (VCH 1957)

'Bincknoll Castle' (name confirmed): a motte and double-bailey situated on an isolated spur of the chalk escarpment. The motte, severely mutilated by quarrying, measures 52.0m in diameter by 3.2m high, and its ditch is 2.3m deep.

The inner bailey, protected by the natural escarpment on the E and W side, has a bank and ditch 3.4m high dividing it from the outer bailey, with an original entrance causeway at SU 10797921. There is evidence of settlement and later quarrying within the bailey. The outer bailey has been ploughed and the bank and ditch reduced to a low scarp 0.3m high. Site at present under pasture (F1 PAS 14-JAN-75).

Bicknoll Castle lay at the centre of five contiguous estates of Gilbert de Breteuil at Domesday, and was probably the chief caput (Creighton 2000).

Investigated and surveyed by EH in 2003; remains now considered to represent an Iron Age enclosure, though with medieval or later settlement, agricultural activity and quarrying (Field, D and Maxfield, C, EH Archaeological Survey Report AI/18/2003). (PastScape)

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

Not Listed

Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceSU107792
Latitude51.512451171875
Longitude-1.84619998931885
Eastings410750
Northings179210
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Copyright Brian Robert Marshall and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons license.

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Books

  • Salter, Mike, 2002, The Castles of Wessex (Malvern: Folly Publications) p. 88
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 2 p. 498
  • Crowley, D.A. (ed), 1983, VCH Wiltshire Vol. 12 p. 105-19 (tenurial history) online transcription
  • Pugh, R.B. and Crittall, Elizabeth (ed), 1957, VCH Wiltshire Vol. 1 Part 1 p. 263

Journals

  • Creighton, O.H., 2000, 'Early Castles in the Medieval Landscape of Wiltshire' Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine Vol. 93 p. 115 online copy
  • Downman, E.A. and Goddard, E.H., 1919, 'Plans of Wiltshire Earthworks' Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine Vol. 40 p. 352 online copy
  • Goddard, E.H., 1913-14, 'List of prehistoric, Roman and pagan Saxon antiquities' Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine Vol. 38 p. 213 online copy
  • Maskelyne, N.S., 1887, Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine Vol. 23 p. 190 (plan) online copy

Other

  • Field, D and Maxfield, C, 2003, EH Archaeological Survey Report AI/18/2003