Baddesley Clinton Hall

Has been described as a Certain Fortified Manor House

There are major building remains

NameBaddesley Clinton Hall
Alternative Names
Historic CountryWarwickshire
Modern AuthorityWarwickshire
1974 AuthorityWarwickshire
Civil ParishBaddesley Clinton

Baddesley Clinton Hall moated site is a rare example of this class of monument as the site survives in a near-complete condition, with the house intact within the moat. The survival of buried remains of documented early agricultural buildings outside the moat, to the north, is also unusual and will permit a study of the agricultural economy associated with the moated site. Environmental deposits will survive within the waterfilled moat and, despite dredging activities, within the associated fishponds. The importance of the site is enhanced by the survival of written records detailing the history of the site from the 15th century onwards, and the associated fishponds are the most fully documented examples in the county.

The monument is situated approximately 350m north west of St James's Church and includes Baddesley Clinton Hall moated site and its associated fishponds. The moated site has external dimensions of 45m north west-south east and 60m north east-south west. The waterfilled moat arms are revetted in stone and measure up to 12m wide. Access to the moated island is by means of an early 18th century bridge across the north eastern arm of the moat. It has been constructed in red brick and has two circular arches with a plain brick parapet. The bridge is Listed Grade I and is included in the scheduling. The moated island is occupied by Baddesley Clinton Hall, a fortified manor house, which dates mostly from the mid- to late 15th century. The Hall consists of three building ranges which occupy the north eastern, south eastern and south western sides of the island. It is Listed Grade I and is not included in the scheduling but the ground beneath the standing ranges is included. The building range along the north western side of the moated island was demolished in the 18th century. This range will survive as a buried feature and its remains are included in the scheduling

The area to the north and north east of the moated site, known as The Forecourt, was occupied by several buildings during the medieval period. A rectangular building is shown, immediately to the north of the Baddesley Clinton Hall, on a 1699 estate map of the site. The buildings were dismantled during the early 18th century but linear depressions and undulations in the ground surface here, indicate that these buildings will survive as buried features and are included in the scheduling. Immediately to the north west of the moated site are two small waterfilled ponds which are inter-connected by a brick-lined leat. They were dredged in c.1980 when timber drain pipes were located in the bases of the ponds. The drain pipes survive in situ and are included in the scheduling along with the ponds themselves. Documents from the 15th century provide detailed evidence for the construction of these ponds, which are thought to have functioned as breeding tanks for fish. To the south west of the fishponds is a large triangular-shaped pond which extends northwards in the form of a canal. Although the pond is present on the 1699 estate map of the site, it has since been greatly enlarged. It forms part of the landscape setting of Baddesley Clinton Hall but is not included in the scheduling. The building history of Baddesley is complex. The moated site is believed to date from the 13th century, while most of the quadrangular house is no earlier than the 15th century when the site was owned by the Brome family. Their successors, the Ferrers, altered the building in the 16th century and alterations also occurred in the early 18th and the 19th century. (Scheduling Report)

Manor house. Late C15, on earlier site; south-east range refronted c.1736: late C19 service wing added to north-east side of south-west range designed and built by Edward Heneage Dering. Courtyard plan. North-east range: stone ashlar; old brick flues, bridge end stack to right with octagonal brick flue. 2-storey, 6-window range. Gatehouse at right of centre: 4-centred outer archway encloses 4-centred doorway with spandrels. Panelled and studded door to inner doorway. 6-light stone mullion and transom window to first floor. Battlemented parapet to gatehouse. 2-light stone mullion window with 4-centre arched heads to lights, at left of centre 3-light stone mullion window with 4-centre arched heads to lights, at right,. 5-light stone mullion window to left of centre. Two 3-light stone mullion windows, with flat stone arches having keystones, to left. Continuous hoodmould to right, and to left of centre. 4-light stone mullion window to first floor right. 3-light stone mullion window to first floor right of centre. 4-light stone mullion window to first floor left of centre. Two 3-light stone mullion window to first floor left. South-east range: red brick; old plain-tile roof; various brick stacks,with octagonal or diagonally set brick flues, 2 storey A-window range. Irregular fenestration, mostly of C18 three-light wood casements with segmental brick heads. south-west range: stone ashlar; old plain-tile roof; various brick stacks. 2-storey, 6-window range. Irregular fenestration, mostly of 3-light stone mullion windows. Single-storey addition to centre with hipped old plain-tile roof, has 2 round-arched blind recesses to moat. Wood casement window to ground floor. Courtyard: irregular fenestration. Interior: entrance hall has close-studded timber-framing to walls. Great hall has stone fireplace of decorative pillars supporting a frieze and atlantes flanking rectangular panel with round heraldic central panel with strapwork surroundings. Dining room has late C16 panelling and carved wood fireplace with pillars supporting a frieze and with richly carved central heraldic panel. Drawing room has C17 panelling and chimney piece placed here C18 Henry Ferrers' Bedroom, also known as the state bedroom has panelling and chimney-piece of c.1629. Other rooms also have panelling and carved chimney pieces. Bridge. Early C18. Red brick. 2 round arches, plain brick parapet. History: site held by the Clintons, then was bought by John Brome in 1438. Held by the Brome family, and passed by inheritance to the Ferrers family in 1517. Henry Ferrers (1549-1633) carried out much work at the house. (Listed Building Report)

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

This is a Grade 1 listed building protected by law

Historic England Scheduled Monument Number
Historic England Listed Building number(s)
Images Of England
Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceSP199714
Latitude52.3409690856934
Longitude-1.70863997936249
Eastings419950
Northings271470
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Copyright Eric Hardy All rights reserved.
Copyright Eric Hardy All rights reserved.
Copyright Eric Hardy All rights reserved.
Copyright Eric Hardy All rights reserved.
Copyright Eric Hardy All rights reserved.
Copyright Eric Hardy All rights reserved.
Copyright Eric Hardy All rights reserved.
Copyright Eric Hardy All rights reserved.
Copyright Eric Hardy All rights reserved.
Copyright Eric Hardy All rights reserved.

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Books

  • Emery, Anthony, 2000, Greater Medieval Houses of England and Wales Vol. 2 East Anglia, Central England and Wales (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) p. 359
  • Salter, Mike, 1992, Castles and Moated Mansions of Warwickshire (Malvern: Folly Publications) p. 16
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 2 p. 486
  • Girouard, Mark, 1981, The return to Camelot: chivalry and the English gentleman (New Haven: Yale University Press) p. 202-4
  • Pevsner, Nikolaus and Wedgwood, Alexandra, 1966, Buildings of England: Warwickshire p. 81-2
  • Salzman, L.F. (ed), 1947, VCH Warwickshire Vol. 4 p. 13-19 online transcription
  • Norris, Henry, 1897, Baddesley Clinton: its manor, church and hall : with some account of the family of Ferrers from the Norman Conquest to the present day (London, Leamington: Art and Book Company)

Journals

  • Alcock, Nathaniel Warren and Meeson, Robert, 2007, 'Baddesley Clinton : architectural responses to social circumstances' Antiquaries Journal Vol. 87 p. 295-345
  • Currie, Christopher K., 2000, 'A watching brief on service trenches at Baddesley Clinton, Warwickshire' Birmingham and Warwickshire Archaeological Society Transactions Vol. 102 p. 73-81
  • Cornforth, John, 1978 June 22 and 29, 'Baddesley Clinton' Country Life p. 1802-5, 1866-9
  • Oswald, Arthur, 1932 April 9 and 16, 'Baddesley Clinton' Country Life
  • Porter, Bernard A., 1912 Sept, 'The Story of Baddesley Clinton' The Country Home
  • H.B., 1905 Dec 30, 'Baddesley Clinton' Country Life
  • Baker, Oliver, 1891, 'Baddesley Clinton Hall' Birmingham and Midland Institute Archaeological Section's Transactions Vol. 17 p. 74-99

Guide Books

  • Haworth, Jeffrey, 1983, Baddesley Clinton Guide Book (National Trust)