Greasley Castle

Has been described as a Certain Masonry Castle

There are masonry footings remains

NameGreasley Castle
Alternative NamesGriseleia; Gryseleye; Griseley
Historic CountryNottinghamshire
Modern AuthorityNottinghamshire
1974 AuthorityNottinghamshire
Civil ParishGreasley

Greasley Castle, a fortified manor house, was called a castle from 1340 when a licence to crenellate his dwelling at 'Gryseleye' was granted to Nicholas de Cantelupe by Edw. III. The castle and lands passed through the hands of succeeding owners; the last recorded being Sir John Manners, early 17th c. 'Throsby (1797) states that "the mansion of Nicholas de Cantelupe ... is totally destroyed except a plain wall or two." 'The remains of the house, including a wall almost 5ft thick and a 14th c. square-headed window, are incorporated in the farm buildings (of Greasley Castle Farm). Trial excavations, in the summer of 1933, disclosed part of the foundations of a round tower, 20ft in diameter, at the NW corner of the building. No sign of foundations was found at the NE corner over at a depth of nearly 6 feet, but broken C17 (kitchen) pottery was found at a depth of 3'6" and below. This discovery and Thorsby's statement about the remains of the mansion seems to suggest a date about 1700 as the probable time at which Greasley was abandoned and its destruction begun'. (PastScape ref. Herbert Green)

Manorial stronghold, "Greasley-Seven miles north-west from Nottingham are the ruins of Greasley Castle, built amid earthen defences. A length of vallum on the south of the building, a fosse at right angles, and two other ramparts apparently formed the boundaries of two courts. South-west of the castle is a long length of rampart; at the west end it returns north for a distance of 300ft and at its eastern extremity is a similar return, the angle thus formed is moated and contains a series of parallel hollows. This was no doubt the manorial fish stew and though high and dry on a sloping hillside there is evidence that water once flowed from this spring-fed stew-pond. The rampart of earth south-east is high enough to have held back the water to fill the four stews, though the base of them is 5ft higher than that of the moat". (VCH)

Gatehouse Comments

The entire area bounded by the earthworks is a SAM, the buildings (house and farm buildings) are all Grade 2 listed. Some earthworks were destroyed when the adjacent graveyard was extended in the mid C19. Given that the 1933 excavations were carried out over only two days, and the holes were backfilled at the end of each day it is doubtful whether much credence can be given to the conclusions reached given the paucity of remains revealed. The cellar of the apparently Georgian house much older, probably medieval in date, and may once have formed part of the castle. Gatehouse thanks Richard Skinner for some of this infomation.

- Philip Davis

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

This is a Grade 2 listed building protected by law

Historic England Scheduled Monument Number
Historic England Listed Building number(s)
Images Of England
Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceSK491470
Latitude53.0191497802734
Longitude-1.27028000354767
Eastings449100
Northings347000
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Photograph by Andrew Herrett. All rights reserved
Photograph by Andrew Herrett. All rights reserved
Photograph by Andrew Herrett. All rights reserved
Photograph by Andrew Herrett. All rights reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved
Photo by Andrew Herrett All Rights Reserved

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Books

  • Wright, James, 2008, Castles of Nottinghamshire (Nottinghamshire County Council) p. 49-50, 65
  • Salter, Mike, 2002, The Castles of the East Midlands (Malvern: Folly Publications) p. 85
  • Emery, Anthony, 2000, Greater Medieval Houses of England and Wales Vol. 2 East Anglia, Central England and Wales (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) p. 327
  • Pettifer, A., 1995, English Castles, A guide by counties (Woodbridge: Boydell Press) p. 203 (slight)
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 2 p. 380
  • Pevsner, Nikolaus, 1951, Buildings of England: Nottinghamshire (London) p. 76
  • Harvey, Alfred, 1911, Castles and Walled Towns of England (London: Methuen and Co)
  • Stevenson, W., 1906, in Page, Wm (ed), VCH Nottinghamshire Vol. 1 p. 311 online copy
  • Baron von Hube, Rodolph, 1901, Griseleia; Snotinghscire (Nottingham)
  • Mackenzie, J.D., 1896, Castles of England; their story and structure (New York: Macmillan) Vol. 1 p. 448-9 online copy
  • Cornelius Brown, 1891, The History of Nottinghamshire p. 240 online copy
  • Turner, T.H. and Parker, J.H., 1859, Some account of Domestic Architecture in England (Oxford) Vol. 3 Part 2 p. 412 online copy
  • Thoroton, R. (with additions by J. Thorsby), 1797, History of Nottinghamshire (Thorsby) Vol. 2 p. 239- online copy

Journals

  • Speight, Sarah, 2008, 'Castles as Past Culture: Living with Castles in the Post-Medieval World' Cha^teau Gaillard Vol. 23 p. 385-94 (slight)
  • Speight, Sarah, 2008-9, 'Castles as Past Culture 2: Adaptation and Identity in the Post-Life of Castles' Castles Studies Group Journal Vol. 22 p. 268-75
  • Speight, Sarah, 2006, 'Castles and Settlement in Rural Nottinghamshire: Laxton, Egmanton and Greasley' Ch√Ęteau Gaillard Vol. 22 p. 325-34
  • Speight, Sarah, 1995, 'Four More Early Medieval 'Castles' Sites in Nottinghamshire' Transactions of the Thoroton Society of Nottinghamshire Vol. 99 p. 70-1
  • Green, Herbert, 1934, 'Greasley Castle' Transactions of the Thoroton Society of Nottinghamshire Vol. 38 p. 34-53 (plan and ill.) online copy
  • Chalkley Gould, I., 1907, 'Some Nottinghamshire Strongholds' Journal of the British Archaeological Association Vol. 13 p. 51-64 esp. 62-3 (plan) online copy

Primary Sources

  • Maxwell Lyte, H.C. (ed), 1898, Calendar of Patent Rolls Edward III (1338-40) Vol. 4 p. 449 online copy
  • Rickard, John, 2002, The Castle Community. The Personnel of English and Welsh Castles, 1272-1422 (Boydell Press) (lists sources for 1272-1422) p. 379

Other

  • Historic England, 2015, Heritage at Risk East Midlands Register 2015 (London: Historic England) p. 64 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2014, Heritage at Risk Register 2014 East Midlands (London: English Heritage) p. 63 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2013, Heritage at Risk Register 2013 East Midlands (London: English Heritage) p. 63 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2012, Heritage at Risk Register 2012 East Midlands (London: English Heritage) p. 70 online copy