Steeton Hall, South Milford

Has been described as a Possible Fortified Manor House

There are masonry ruins/remnants remains

NameSteeton Hall, South Milford
Alternative NamesStiveton Hall
Historic CountryYorkshire
Modern AuthorityNorth Yorkshire
1974 AuthorityNorth Yorkshire
Civil ParishSouth Milford

The remaining structures and earthworks at Steeton Hall survive well and significant buried archaeological remains will be preserved throughout the monument. The gatehouse survives particularly well and important information about the architectural details are preserved within the fabric. The fishpond as well as the earthworks in the outer precinct offers important information about the wider economic functions of the monument and the development of a high status domestic complex in the medieval and post-medieval periods. The monument includes the site of the magnate's residence and manorial centre of Steeton Hall and the upstanding medieval gatehouse. Included in the scheduling are earthwork remains of the precinct wall, which surrounded the manorial complex and further earthwork remains of structures and garden terraces, both within the precinct and immediately adjacent to it. Upstanding garden and field walls within the precinct area are also included. The monument lies on the southern side of shallow valley with the hall and gatehouse lying on level ground and the precinct extending into the surrounding fields. Part of the medieval Steeton Hall still stands, but has been added to and altered, particularly in the 17th and 19th centuries. It is Listed Grade I and is not included in the scheduling, although the ground beneath it is included. Steeton Hall stood at the centre of a complex of domestic and agricultural structures lying within a large enclosure known as a precinct which was defined by a wall. A gatehouse providing access into the precinct still stands and is Listed Grade I and is also in the guardianship of the Secretary of State. Within the precinct was a smaller inner enclosure which contained the hall itself and the immediate domestic buildings such as staff lodgings and kitchens

In the outer precinct a range of structures associated with the wider agricultural and economic functions of the manorial centre such as stables, workshops, stores and barns would have been located. In the north western section of the precinct are a series of stone revetted terraces orientated north to south which are interpreted as remains of garden terraces. These would have included formal and informal flower beds and may have housed plinths for statues and structures such as stands and summerhouses. The precinct wall survives as a low bank extending eastward from the gatehouse for 100m, turning south for 110m then westward for 270m then northwards towards the stream. In some places stone footings for the wall are visible along the bank and in one place east of the gatehouse 3 courses of stonework survive above ground level. At the northern end of the precinct the stream occupies a deep moat-like cutting, interpreted as an artificially enhanced natural stream bed. This served as a precinct boundary along this side. Further building platforms survive as slight earthwork features to the north east of the gatehouse. Within the north eastern corner of the monument an earthern bank crosses the line of the stream forming a small, now dry, fishpond. The stream has been channeled by stone revetting and a stone abutment on the edge of it are the remains of a sluice for controlling water flow. Within the south eastern section of the precinct are earthwork remains of building platforms. A low wall to the north east of Steeton Cottage has a series of 17th century arched bee boles built into it. These were alcoves to protect bee hives from the weather. This wall, along with others on the site of the 17th century or earlier date, are included in the scheduling. The gatehouse still stands complete. It dates to c1360 and is a two storey rectangular structure with a central archway and a small side passage. There are two chambers on the first floor, the larger of which is reached by a spiral staircase and the smaller by an external stair on the south east side. The top of the gatehouse is crenellated and decorated with gargoyles and coats of arms and crests carved onto stone shields. Steeton Hall is a complex building the core of which dates to the 14th century. The 14th century building is thought to have been much larger than the fragment surviving today and buried remains indicating the full extent and nature of this medieval building will survive beneath and adjacent to the later additions. The latter are 17th century and later in date. The range of stone farm buildings north of the hall were constructed in the late 17th century and may have been built on the footings of earlier structures. They are Listed Grade II and are not included in the scheduling. The core of Steeton Cottage is also thought to date to the 17th century and was altered in the 19th. Steeton manorial centre was one of the manors of the barony of Sherburn and was purchased by the Reygate family in 1261. The hall and the gatehouse were built in the 14th century probably by William de Reygate who was Escheator to the king for the county of York and it was during this time that the manorial centre flourished. The site was then neglected for many years until 1642 when it was occupied by the Foljambe family. The site was substantially re-modelled in the 17th century when the hall was added to, the farm buildings and bee bole wall were constructed and the gardens rebuilt. Much of this activity reused the existing earlier features. (Scheduling Report)

This interesting building is often treated as a castle. In fact, there is nothing even apparently military about it except the pretty little gatehouse... (King)

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

This is a Grade 1 listed building protected by law

Historic England Scheduled Monument Number
Historic England Listed Building number(s)
Images Of England
Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceSE483314
Latitude53.776969909668
Longitude-1.26705002784729
Eastings448360
Northings431420
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved

Most of the sites or buildings recorded in this web site are NOT open to the public and permission to visit a site must always be sought from the landowner or tenant.

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Books

  • English Heritage, 2004, Heritage unlocked: Guide to free sites in Yorkshire and the north east p. 30
  • Turner, Maurice, 2004, Yorkshire Castles: Exploring Historic Yorkshire (Otley: Westbury Publishing) p. 248
  • Ingham, Bernard, 2001, Bernard Ingham's Yorkshire Castles (Dalesman) p. 27 (history confused with the other Steeton Hall at Steeton)
  • Emery, Anthony, 1996, Greater Medieval Houses of England and Wales Vol. 1 Northern England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) p. 315
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 2 p. 534 (rejected as not military)
  • Ryder, P.F., 1982 (paperback edn 1992), The Medieval Buildings of Yorkshire (Ash Grove Book) p. 108-22
  • Pevsner, N., 1959, Buildings of England: Yorkshire: West Riding (London, Penguin) p. 493-4
  • Bogg, Edmund, 1904, The old kingdom of Elmet, the land 'twixt aire and wharfe p. 207-9 online copy
  • Wheater, W., 1882, The History of the Parishes of Sherburn and Cawood p. 68 online copy
  • Turner, T.H. and Parker, J.H., 1853, Some account of Domestic Architecture in England (Oxford) Vol. 2 p. 227 online copy

Journals

  • Yorkshire Archaeological Journal Vol. 23 p. 118
  • Kitson, S. and Crossley, E.W., 1910-11, Yorkshire Archaeological Journal Vol. 21 p. 203-10
  • 1860 July, The Gentleman's Magazine Vol. 209 Part 2 p. 73-77 online copy

Other

  • Historic England, 2015, Heritage at Risk Yorkshire Register 2015 (London: Historic England) p. 71 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2014, Heritage at Risk Register 2014 Yorkshire (London: English Heritage) p. 81 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2013, Heritage at Risk Register 2013 Yorkshire (London: English Heritage) p. 84 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2012, Heritage at Risk Register 2012 Yorkshire and the Humber (London: English Heritage) p. 105 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2011, Heritage at Risk Register 2011 Yorkshire and the Humber (London: English Heritage) p. 97 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2010, Heritage at Risk Register 2010 Yorkshire and the Humber (London: English Heritage) p. 103 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2009, Heritage at Risk Register 2009 Yorkshire and the Humber (London: English Heritage) p. 113 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2002, Steeton Hall gateway: conservation statement (York; English Heritage)