Kings Lynn; The Red Mount

Has been described as a Possible Timber Castle (Motte)

There are earthwork remains

NameKings Lynn; The Red Mount
Alternative Names'Ladye Hylle
Historic CountryNorfolk
Modern AuthorityNorfolk
1974 AuthorityNorfolk
Civil ParishKings Lynn

Red Mount Chapel - a remarkable structure exactly dated by the town records which contain a licence to build a chapel on 'Ladye Hylle', dated 25th January, 1485. The mount is part of an old embankment of the Ouse and may have been part of the Mediaeval town defences, and if so would have been between the earth rampart and the ditch. The chapel is of two storeys and of cruciform plan with a panelled stone vault. It was a wayside shrine for Walsingham; it subsequently served as a water cistern, a powder-magazine and a stable. (PastScape ref. Arch. Jour. 1932)

The evaluation revealed the remains of both the northern and southern wall of the original passage entrance into the Basement Chapel, along with a section of the retaining wall that encircled the mound into which the chapel is built. A brick and limestone floor surface was identified in the Basement Chapel and the foundation level of the internal chapel structure was firmly established at 4.83m OD. It was noted that the chapel was built into a previously existing mound as suggested by documentary evidence. (Norfolk HER Ref. Hall, 2002)

Gatehouse Comments

Possible castle mound on line of the town defences surmounted by chapel of about 1485. Protected by wet ditch and Purfleet and Millfleet. E. Rose, the Norfolk CC archaeologist, considers identification as motte unlikely. There doesn't seem to be any documentary evidence of a castle but the location is naturally well defended, this is a was a mound and this was an important medieval town and port where some administrative centre is to be expected. However the manor was episcopal until the C16. If this was a motte then short lived, presumably built immediately post-Conquest and rapidly fell out of use.

- Philip Davis

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

This is a Grade 1 listed building protected by law

Historic England Scheduled Monument Number
Historic England Listed Building number(s)
Images Of England
Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceTF624198
Latitude52.7517509460449
Longitude0.405849993228912
Eastings562460
Northings319840
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Books

  • Salter, Mike, 2001, The Castles of East Anglia (Malvern: Folly Publications) p. 58
  • Rogerson, Andrew, 1994, 'Castles' in Wade-Martins, P, (ed), An Historical Atlas of Norfolk (2edn Norwich; Norfolk Museums) p. 68-9
  • Margeson, S., Seiller, F. and Rogerson, A., 1994, The Normans in Norfolk (Norfolk Museums Service) p. 24
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 2 p. 310
  • Turner, T.H. and Parker, J.H., 1859, Some account of Domestic Architecture in England (Oxford) Vol. 3 Part 2 p. 286 online copy
  • Blomefield, F., 1808, 'Freebridge Hundred and Half: Lynn' An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk Vol. 8 p. 476-533 (tenurial history) online transcription

Journals

  • Bradfer-Lawrence, H.L., 1932, The Archaeological Journal Vol. 89 p. 337 online copy

Other

  • Hall, R.V., 2002, APS Report 140/02. Archaeological Investigations at Red Mount Chapel, King's Lynn, Norfolk