Elsing Hall

Has been described as a Certain Fortified Manor House

There are masonry footings remains

NameElsing Hall
Alternative Names
Historic CountryNorfolk
Modern AuthorityNorfolk
1974 AuthorityNorfolk
Civil ParishElsing

Moated medieval manor house, altered in the mid C18 and restored and extended in 1852 by Thomas Jekyll. The medieval house was built circa 1460-70 by Sir Hugh Hastings. It comprised a central open hall with cross wings, a chapel to the east and service wing to the west. Much of the present exterior is C19 in date. The foundations of a gatehouse, a tower and a stretch of curtain wall were identified in 1852 and excavated in the 1980s. They are believed to date from C15. (PastScape)

A defensive moat with associated fishponds encircles the Hall. The moat island is not raised above the surrounding countryside and it seems likely that the spoil from the moat ditch was used to construct retaining banks on the west and south sides. The moat is in good condition and is fed by a stream which enters at the south-east corner. The moat discharges on the west side into the fishpond and from there back into the mother stream. The original and only entrance is from the north. Flint foundations of a massive character, possibly C13 (Boston, 1950) are visible on the west side of the island, and also immediately to the south of the entrance bridge. (PastScape–Field Investigators Comments–F1 JB 25-FEB-73)

Not scheduled

This is a Grade 1 listed building protected by law

Historic England Scheduled Monument Number
Historic England Listed Building number(s)
Images Of England
Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceTG039160
Latitude52.7033309936523
Longitude1.01786005496979
Eastings603990
Northings316000
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
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Books

  • Cushion, B. and Davison, A., 2003, Earthworks of Norfolk (Dereham: East Anglian Archaeology 104) p. 98-100 (plan)
  • Emery, Anthony, 2000, Greater Medieval Houses of England and Wales Vol. 2 East Anglia, Central England and Wales (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) p. 86-9
  • Pevsner, Nikolaus, 1962, The Buildings of England: Norfolk: North-West and South (Penguin) p. 157
  • Blomefield, F., 1808, 'Eynford Hundred: Elsing' An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk Vol. 8 p. 201-3 (tenurial history) online transcription

Journals

  • NAU Archaeology, 2008, 'Medieval Britain and Ireland' Medieval Archaeology Vol. 52 [online copy > http://ads.ahds.ac.uk/catalogue/library/mbi/fullrecord.cfm?id=187
  • Boston, N., 1950-51, The Archaeological Journal Vol. 106 p. 112 online copy
  • Jeckell, T., 1864, 'Brief Remarks on Elsing Hall' Norfolk Archaeology Vol. 6 p. 189-192 online copy

Other

  • Wilson, D., 2005, Elsing Hall (unpublished)
  • Rose, E., 1984, Building Report (unpublished)