Baconsthorpe Castle

Has been described as a Certain Fortified Manor House

There are masonry ruins/remnants remains

NameBaconsthorpe Castle
Alternative Names
Historic CountryNorfolk
Modern AuthorityNorfolk
1974 AuthorityNorfolk
Civil ParishBaconsthorpe

The remains of a moated site and fortified house known as Baconsthorpe Castle. Baconsthorpe Castle is built on what is thought to have been the site of the earlier manor of Wood Hall. The fortified house was built during the middle and later 15th century. The outer gatehouse and courtyards, with associated barn, were built during the following century. Alterations to the house were carried out in the early 17th century by Sir Christopher Heydon II, but by this time the fortunes of the family were in decline, and in the mid 17th century most of the buildings on the moated site were demolished and the gatehouse and outer walls were dismantled. After the demolition, the outer gatehouse was converted for use as a dwelling, known as Baconsthorpe Hall. Today, the site is managed by English Heritage. The remains of the fortified house occupy a roughly square platform 65 metres across, surrounded on the south, west and north sides by a water-filled moat between 13-15 metres wide. The standing remains of the house on the central island include a surrounding curtain wall rising above the inner edges of the moat, a gatehouse on the southern side, and a range of buildings along the southern part of the inner face of the wall on the east side. The walls of the house and associated structures have a core of mortared flint rubble with stone and brick dressings. (PastScape)

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

This is a Grade 1 listed building protected by law

Historic England Scheduled Monument Number
Historic England Listed Building number(s)
Images Of England
Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceTG121381
Latitude52.8990898132324
Longitude1.15210998058319
Eastings612100
Northings338100
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
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Copyright Evelyn Simak and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons license.
Copyright Evelyn Simak and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons license.
Copyright Evelyn Simak and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons license.
Copyright Evelyn Simak and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons license.
Copyright Evelyn Simak and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons license.
Copyright Evelyn Simak and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons license.
Copyright Evelyn Simak and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons license.
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Most of the sites or buildings recorded in this web site are NOT open to the public and permission to visit a site must always be sought from the landowner or tenant.

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Books

  • Goodall, John, 2011, The English Castle 1066-1650 (Yale University Press) p. 359
  • Cushion, B. and Davison, A., 2003, Earthworks of Norfolk (Dereham: East Anglian Archaeology 104) p. 162-5 (plan)
  • < >Dallas, Carolyn and Sherlock, David, 2002, Baconsthorpe Castle, Excavations and Finds, 1951-1972 (Dereham: East Anglian Archaeology 102) < >
  • Salter, Mike, 2001, The Castles of East Anglia (Malvern: Folly Publications) p. 42-4
  • Emery, Anthony, 2000, Greater Medieval Houses of England and Wales Vol. 2 East Anglia, Central England and Wales (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) p. 49
  • Pettifer, A., 1995, English Castles, A guide by counties (Woodbridge: Boydell Press) p. 154-5
  • Rogerson, Andrew, 1994, 'Castles' in Wade-Martins, P, (ed), An Historical Atlas of Norfolk (2edn Norwich; Norfolk Museums) p. 68-9
  • Kent, Peter, 1988, Fortifications of East Anglia (Lavenham: Ternence Dalton) p. 175
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 2 p. 310
  • Fry, P.S., 1980, Castles of the British Isles (David and Charles) p. 181
  • Wilton, J.W., 1979, Earthworks and Fortifications of Norfolk (Weathercock Press) p. 24
  • Pevsner, Nikolaus, 1962, The Buildings of England: Norfolk: North-West and South (Penguin) p. 80
  • Lord Harlech, 1955, Ancient Monuments Vol. 3 - East Anglia and the Midlands (HMSO) p. 43, 72
  • Blomefield, F., 1807, 'Hundred of South Erpingham: Baconsthorp' An Essay towards a Topographical History of the County of Norfolk Vol. 6 p. 502-13 (tenurial history) online transcription

Antiquarian

  • Chandler, John, 1993, John Leland's Itinerary: travels in Tudor England  (Sutton Publishing) p. 315
  • Toulmin-Smith, Lucy (ed), 1908, The itinerary of John Leland in or about the years 1535-1543 (London: Bell and Sons) Vol. 2 p. 11 online copy

Journals

  • Coulson, Charles, 1993 Aug, 'Specimens of Freedom to Crenellate by Licence' Fortress: The castles and fortifications quarterly Vol. 18 p. 3-15
  • Kenyon, J.R., 1981 'Early Artillery Fortifications in England and Wales: a Preliminary Survey and Re-appraisal' The Archaeological Journal Vol. 138 p. 226-7
  • Rigold, S., 1980, 'Baconsthorpe Castle' The Archaeological Journal Vol. 137 p. 331-2
  • Kenyon, J.R., 1977, 'Early Gunports' Fort Vol. 4 p. 76
  • Cozens-Hardy, 1958-61, Norfolk Archaeology Vol. 32 p. 166-7
  • 1932, Norfolk Archaeology Vol. 24 p. lix-lxi

Guide Books

  • Rigold, S., 1966, Baconsthorpe Castle (HMSO)

Primary Sources

  • 1948, Calendar of Patent Rolls Elizabeth (1560-63) Vol. 2 p. 219