Farleton Castle

Has been described as a Possible Fortified Manor House

There are earthwork remains

NameFarleton Castle
Alternative NamesCamp house
Historic CountryLancashire
Modern AuthorityLancashire
1974 AuthorityLancashire
Civil ParishHornby With Farleton

Camp House moated site, moated outwork and connecting channels survives well, the earthworks being particularly evident. The monument displays a diversity of components which include two moated sites, one of very small size, interconnected by channels for water management. Both moated sites and channels survive relatively undisturbed and possess considerable potential for the recovery of archaeological details of their original form and constructional remains. The channels linking the two sites will also preserve details of the original inter-relationship of the two moated sites.

The site comprises a main moated site consisting of a rectangular island surrounded by a flat-bottomed marshy moat which in turn is surrounded by an outer shallow channel. A hollow way runs from the northeast corner of the main moat to the main road 300m to the east. Some 90m north of the northwest corner of the island is a moated outwork consisting of a small island surrounded by a shallow moat. This outwork is connected by a short length of ditch to a system of channels linking the main moated site with a channel of the River Lune 350m to the northeast. Moated sites are generally seen as the prestigious residences of the Lords of the manor. The moat in such circumstances marked the high status of the occupier, but also served to deter casual raiders and wild animals. Most moats were constructed between 1250-1350. The main moat is well defined, predominantly dry but containing some marshy areas. Masonry foundations occupy part of the island and earthworks project into or are located within the moat. Outer banks are found on all sides. The moated outwork and connecting channels are dry as is the outer shallow channel. The sum of the evidence suggest that this monument is an unusual example of its type

The fence to the east of the main moated site is not included in the scheduling, neither is a drainage trench and drain aligned NW-SE that crosses the monument close to its W corner, or a second drainage trench and drain running below the moated outwork's NW arm. (Scheduling Report)

Possible fortified manor house and park. In 1479, Sir James Harrington was granted a licence to crenellate his house and enclose and empark all his lands. A later source refers to a castle and park at Farleton, which had fallen into disrepair by the 16th century. The exact site of the manor house is not known, but it may be related to the moated site at Farleton. (PastScape 42925)

SD578669. Possible Medieval defensive earthworks comprising of a mound with revetments. (PastScape 42923)

SD 57226755. Medieval moated site with small moated outwork and connecting channels, surviving as earthworks. (PastScape 42899)

Gatehouse Comments

Suggested castle site rejected by King. Farleton supposedly had castle that disappeared after 1600. Salter writes "Excavations on a platform here revealed part of a retaining wall of cut blocks but no buildings or proper moat." Possible fortified manor house and park. In 1479, Sir James Harrington was granted a licence to crenellate his house and enclose and empark all his lands. A later source refers to a castle and park at Farleton, which had fallen into disrepair by C16. The exact site of the manor house is not known but possibly Medieval defensive earthworks comprising of a mound with revetments excavated by G L Shearer in 1956 at SD578669 or Medieval moated site with small moated outwork and connecting channels, surviving as earthworks at SD57206756 (This seems to be the more likely site and from the air photo this looks to be a large square moat.)

- Philip Davis

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

Not Listed

Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceSD572675
Latitude54.10205078125
Longitude-2.65578007698059
Eastings357200
Northings467560
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Photograph by Matthew Emmott. All rights reserved
Photograph by Matthew Emmott. All rights reserved
Photograph by Matthew Emmott. All rights reserved

Most of the sites or buildings recorded in this web site are NOT open to the public and permission to visit a site must always be sought from the landowner or tenant.

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Books

  • Salter, Mike, 2001, The Castles and Tower Houses of Lancashire and Cheshire (Malvern: Folly Publications) p. 25
  • Emery, Anthony, 1996, Greater Medieval Houses of England and Wales Vol. 1 Northern England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) p. 263
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 1 p. 250 (reject)
  • Gibson, Leslie Irving, 1977, Lancashire Castles and Towers (Dalesman Books)
  • Farrer, William and Brownbill, J. (eds), 1914, VCH Lancashire Vol. 8 p. 202 online transcription
  • Gardner, W., 1908, 'Ancient Earthworks:- Lancashire South of the Sands' in Farrer, William and Brownbill, J. (eds), VCH Lancashire Vol. 2 p. 549-50 (plan), 554 online copy
  • Mackenzie, J.D., 1896, Castles of England; their story and structure (New York: Macmillan) Vol. 2 p. 185 online copy
  • Baines, E., 1836, History of the County Palatine and Duchy of Lancaster (London: Fisher, Son, and Jackson) Vol. 4 p. 606

Journals

  • White, A.J., 1998, 'Assessment of Archaeological and Historical Evidence from Camp House, Farleton' Contrebis Vol. 23 p. 28 online copy
  • Goth, D.M., 1998, 'Excavations of a Medieval Moated Site at Camp House Farm, Hornby-with-Farleton, 1964-65' Contrebis Vol. 23 p. 24-27 online copy
  • Withersby, J., 1979, Moated Sites Research Group Report Vol. 6 p. 12-13 (plan)
  • (Shearer), 1957, Medieval Archaeology Vol. 1 p. 157 online copy

Primary Sources

  • Maxwell Lyte, H.C. (ed), 1901, Calendar of Patent Rolls Edward IV, Edward V, Richard III (1476-85) p. 151 online copy

Other

  • Matthew Emmott -pers corr writes of the SD57206756 site that the earthworks are well defined and that some small amounts of masonry are visible. (see his photo's)