Hornby Castlestede

Has been described as a Certain Timber Castle (Motte)

There are earthwork remains

NameHornby Castlestede
Alternative NamesCastle Stede; Castleton; Orneby
Historic CountryLancashire
Modern AuthorityLancashire
1974 AuthorityLancashire
Civil ParishHornby With Farleton

The monument at Castle Stede is of particular importance as one of a group of early post-Conquest (late 11th century) mottes established along the Lune Valley. These sites were all of strategic importance, allowing control of movement along the river valley. More important, however, was their role in imposing and demonstrating the new post-Conquest feudal order on the area. It is the best example of a motte and bailey castle in Lancashire. Its earthworks survive well and the lack of subsequent occupation on the site means that buried structural remains and environmental evidence is likely to survive well. The positioning of a pill box on the site emphasises the continued strategic importance of the site in the early 20th century.

Castle Stede consists of a motte and bailey castle situated at the NW extremity of a ridge of high ground projecting to the banks of the River Lune overlooking Loyn Bridge. The monument comprises a conical motte surrounded by a ditch on three sides. To the W is an oval-shaped bailey defended by a rampart and ditch on its S side. To the N and NW a steep slope down to the river affords protection. A modern causeway, on the site of the original, gives access into the bailey, while a mound and a cutting on the W side of the motte indicates the site of access from the bailey. During World War II a pill box, which is also included in the scheduling, was constructed on the outer edge of the bailey ditch on the south side of the monument. (Scheduling Report)

Castle Stede is a motte and bailey castle covering an area of 2 1/4 acres, situated on a promontary overlooking the River Lune. It has an oval-shaped bailey, protected on the north and west sides by steep slopes, and on the south side by a rampart and ditch. On this side the gateway entrance appears to have been greatly defaced by modern agriculture

The circular and conical motte is surrounded by a ditch, except for a few yards on the north side where the natural slope takes it place. Excavations were carried out on the centre of the motte by Dr Lingard (19th century historian) but with negative results; ? Plans. Renn, giving documentary evidence stated that "This (rather than the later castle) is probably that seized from Roger de Montbegon III by John in 1205 but returned three months later...; probably also the Orneby of 1200". The bailey associated with the motte at Castlestede may have originally been an Iron Age Fort according to Forde-Johnston. Well defined motte and bailey on OS air photographs (Curwen; Renn; Forde-Johnston; OS APs). (PastScape)

Gatehouse Comments

See also Castle Hornby the successor site. Some of the C13 history may be confabulated between the two sites as the construction date of Castle Hornby is not securely known. The suggestion that this may have originated as an Iron Age site appears weak to Gatehouse.

- Philip Davis

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

Not Listed

Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceSD583697
Latitude54.1219100952148
Longitude-2.63980007171631
Eastings358332
Northings469757
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved
Photograph by Philip Davis. All rights reserved

Most of the sites or buildings recorded in this web site are NOT open to the public and permission to visit a site must always be sought from the landowner or tenant.

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Books

  • Grimsditch, Brian, Nevell, Michael and Nevell, Richard, 2012, Buckton Castle and the Castles of the North West England (University of Salford Archaeological Monograph 2) p. 108-9
  • Lancashire County Council, 2006, Lancashire Historic Town Survey Hornby online copy
  • Salter, Mike, 2001, The Castles and Tower Houses of Lancashire and Cheshire (Malvern: Folly Publications) p. 27
  • Pettifer, A., 1995, English Castles, A guide by counties (Woodbridge: Boydell Press) p. 136 (slight)
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 1 p. 246
  • Gibson, Leslie Irving, 1977, Lancashire Castles and Towers (Dalesman Books)
  • Curwen, J.F., 1913, Castles and Fortified Towers of Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire North of the Sands (Kendal: T. Wilson) p. 17 (plan)
  • Harvey, Alfred, 1911, Castles and Walled Towns of England (London: Methuen and Co)
  • Gardner, W., 1908, 'Ancient Earthworks:- Lancashire South of the Sands' in Farrer, William and Brownbill, J. (eds), VCH Lancashire Vol. 2 p. 526-8 (plan) online copy

Journals

  • Higham, Mary, 1991, 'The Mottes of North Lancashire, Lonsdale and South Cumbria' Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society Vol. 91 p. 79-90 (reprinted in Crosby, A.G. (ed), 2007, Of names and places: selected writings of Mary Higham (Nottingham: English Place-Name Society and the Society for Name Studies) p. 81-91) online copy
  • White, A J, 1985-6, 'Some Notes on Medieval Hornby' Contrebis Vol. 12 p. 1-7 online copy
  • Forde-Johnston, J., 1962, Transactions of the Lancashire and Cheshire Antiquarian Society Vol. 72 p. 12
  • Brown, R. Allen, 1959, 'A List of Castles, 1154–1216' English Historical Review Vol. 74 p. 249-280 (Reprinted in Brown, R. Allen, 1989, Castles, conquest and charters: collected papers (Woodbridge: Boydell Press) p. 90-121) view online copy (subscription required)
  • Curwen, J.F., 1912, 'The Castlestede, near Hornby, Lancashire' Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society Vol. 12 p. 412-4 online copy

Guide Books

  • White, A.J., 1998, Norman Castles of Lunedale A History Trail (Lancaster City Museums) (Leaflet)

Primary Sources

  • Hardy, D.H (ed), 1835, Rotuli de oblatis et finibus in Turri Londinensi asservati tempore Regis Johannis (London: PRO) p. 275 online copy

Other

  • Historic England, 2015, Heritage at Risk North West Register 2015 (London: Historic England) p. 61 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2014, Heritage at Risk Register 2014 North West (London: English Heritage) p. 63 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2013, Heritage at Risk Register 2013 North West (London: English Heritage) p. 62 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2012, Heritage at Risk Register 2012 North West (London: English Heritage) p. 71 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2011, Heritage at Risk Register 2011 North West (London: English Heritage) p. 62 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2010, Heritage at Risk Register 2010 North West (London: English Heritage) p. 56 online copy
  • English Heritage, 2009, Heritage at Risk Register 2009 North West (London: English Heritage) p. 60 online copy
  • Lancashire County Council and Egerton Lea Consultancy, 2006, Lancashire Historic Town Survey Programme: Hornby; Historic Town Assessment Report (Lancashire County Council) online copy
  • Constable, Christopher, 2003, Aspects of the archaeology of the castle in the north of England C 1066-1216 (Doctoral thesis, Durham University) Available at Durham E-Theses Online