Allington Castle

Has been described as a Certain Timber Castle (Motte), and also as a Certain Masonry Castle

There are major building remains

NameAllington Castle
Alternative NamesAlington; Alintona
Historic CountryKent
Modern AuthorityKent
1974 AuthorityKent
Civil ParishMaidstone

The 1st castle on the site was a moated mound built by William de Warenne. In the C12 further building took place to the north of this, but this castle was 'overthrown' in 117+, and a small manor house built on the site. Portions of both these constructions were incorporated in the subsequent Castle. The present building was erected by Stephen de Penctester, or Penshurst, between 1279 and 1299 and continued by his son-in-law and successor Sir Henry de Cobham in the early C14. It was altered by Sir Henry Wyatt after 1492. It was forfeited to the Crown in 1554 at Sir Thomas Wyatt's rebellion. It subsequently became 2 farm houses and eventually fell into ruins, from which is was rescued by Lord Conway who, with his architect W D Caroe, thoroughly restored the Castle between 1905 and 1929. It is a square fortified country house consisting of buildings ranged round the inside of the courtyard with a curtain wall connecting them and semi-circular towers facing the moat which connects with the Medway. In the south-west corner is Solomn's Tower of 4 storeys, which is larger than the other towers. In the north-west corner is the Gatehouse with restored machicolation and battlements, and iron-studded mediaeval double doors, approached by a barbican and stone bridge over the moat. The lower portions of the Gatehouse date from the C12 manor house. The wing which divides the courtyard in half was built by Sir Henry Wyatt and contained a long gallery, which was probably one of the 1st long galleries in England to be constructed. This was later destroyed but was restored by Lord Conway. Sir Henry Wyatt added the timber-frame buildings in the south-east corner of the Castle which were the kitchen and offices. Them are of 2 storeys and attic, the ground and 1st floors being of stone with 2 timbered gables above, rendered and overhanging on bressumers with moulded bargeboards and pendants and 1 gabled dormer. Casement windows with small square leaded panes

Sir Henry Wyatt also altered most of the windows of the Castle. His Son Sir Thomas Wyatt, the poet, was born here in 1503. The latter's son, Sir Thomas Wyatt, also lived here till his insurrection in 1554. Henry VII visited the Castle in Sir Henry Wyatt's time; Henry VIII in 1527, 1530 and 1536; also Cardinal Wolsey in 1527 and Catherine Parr in 1544. (Listed Building Report)

A square fortified country house with a moat connecting to the River Medway. The first castle on the site is believed to have been a motte and bailey constructed between 1135 and 1154. This was demolished by Henry II, having been erected without royal licence. Subsequently a small unfortified manor house was built on the site. The present structure was erected by Stephen de Penchester between 1279 and 1299, with further alterations and additions in the early 14th century and after 1492. It was forfeited to the crown in 1554 at Sir Thomas Wyatt's rebellion, subsequently becoming two farmhouses. Eventually falling into ruins, it was restored between 1905 and 1929 by Lord Conway and his architects W. D. Caroe and Philip Tilden. The site was sold to the Carmelite Order in 1951 and was home to a community of friars for a number of years, by the early years of the 21st century it was in private ownership. Allington Castle currently comprises a series of buildings ranged around the inside of the courtyards with a curtain wall connecting them and with semi-circular towers facing the moat. In the south west corner is Solomon's Tower which, at four storeys, is taller than the other towers. The restored gatehouse, approached by barbican and stone bridge over the moat, is in the north west corner. The lower portions of the gatehouse date from the 12th century. (PastScape)

Not scheduled

This is a Grade 1 listed building protected by law

Historic England Scheduled Monument Number
Historic England Listed Building number(s)
Images Of England
Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceTQ752579
Latitude51.2934684753418
Longitude0.511420011520386
Eastings575200
Northings157910
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
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Copyright Moira Anne Rye All Rights Reserved
Copyright Moira Anne Rye All Rights Reserved
Copyright Moira Anne Rye All Rights Reserved
Copyright Moira Anne Rye All Rights Reserved
Copyright Moira Anne Rye All Rights Reserved
Copyright Moira Anne Rye All Rights Reserved
Copyright Moira Anne Rye All Rights Reserved
Copyright Moira Anne Rye All Rights Reserved
Copyright Moira Anne Rye All Rights Reserved
Copyright Moira Anne Rye All Rights Reserved

Most of the sites or buildings recorded in this web site are NOT open to the public and permission to visit a site must always be sought from the landowner or tenant.

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Books

  • Goodall, John, 2011, The English Castle 1066-1650 (Yale University Press) p. 174, 233
  • Salter, Mike, 2000, The Castles of Kent (Malvern: Folly Publications) p. 18-19
  • Pettifer, A., 1995, English Castles, A guide by counties (Woodbridge: Boydell Press) p. 110 -11
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 1 p. 228
  • Newman, John, 1983, Buildings of England: North east and east Kent (Harmondsworth) p. 124-5
  • Guy, John, 1980, Kent Castles (Meresborough Books)
  • Smithers, David Waldron, 1980, Castles in Kent (Chatham)
  • Fry, P.S., 1980, Castles of the British Isles (David and Charles) p. 178
  • Renn, D.F., 1973 (2 edn.), Norman Castles of Britain (London: John Baker) p. 88
  • Tipping, H.A., 1921, English Homes, period 1 Vol. 1 (London) p. 189-200
  • Harvey, Alfred, 1911, Castles and Walled Towns of England (London: Methuen and Co)
  • Gould, I. Chalkley, 1908, in Page, Wm (ed), VCH Kent Vol. 1 p. 411-12 online copy
  • Sands, Harold, 1907, 'Some Kentish Castles' in Ditchfield and Clinch, Memorials of Old Kent (London) p. 176-79 online copy
  • Mackenzie, J.D., 1896, Castles of England; their story and structure (New York: Macmillan) Vol. 1 p. 1-5 online copy
  • Timbs, J. and Gunn, A., 1872, Abbeys, Castles and Ancient Halls of England and Wales Vol. 1 (London) p. 313-4 online copy
  • Turner, T.H. and Parker, J.H., 1859, Some account of Domestic Architecture in England (Oxford) Vol. 3 Part 2 p. 403 online copy
  • Hasted, Edward, 1798 (2edn), The history and topographical survey of the county of Kent Vol. 4 p. 448-54 online transcription
  • Grose, Francis, 1785 (new edn orig 1756), Antiquities of England and Wales (London) Vol. 3 p. 1-3 online copy
  • Buck, Samuel and Nathaniel, 1774, Buck's Antiquities (London) Vol. 1 p. 121

Antiquarian

  • Camden, Wm, 1607, Britannia hypertext critical edition by Dana F. Sutton (2004)
  • Chandler, John, 1993, John Leland's Itinerary: travels in Tudor England  (Sutton Publishing) p. 250
  • Toulmin-Smith, Lucy (ed), 1909, The itinerary of John Leland in or about the years 1535-1543 (London: Bell and Sons) Vol. 4 p. 46, 52, 62 online copy

Journals

  • Goodall, J., 2015, 'A medieval retreat: Allington Castle, Kent' Country Life Vol. 209:9 p. 54-59
  • Coulson, Charles, 2007-8, 'On Crenellating, in Kent and Beyond - A Retrospection' Castle Studies Group Journal Vol. 21 p. 189-201 esp p. 194
  • Guy, Neil, 2000-2001, 'The 14th Annual Conference of the Castle Studies Group The Castles of Kent and East Sussex 6-9 April 2000' Castle Studies Group Newsletter No. 14 p. 3-5 online copy
  • Brown, R. Allen, 1959, 'A List of Castles, 1154–1216' English Historical Review Vol. 74 p. 249-280 (Reprinted in Brown, R. Allen, 1989, Castles, conquest and charters: collected papers (Woodbridge: Boydell Press) p. 90-121) view online copy (subscription required)
  • 1928, Country Life Vol. 63 p. 438-44
  • 1918, Country Life Vol. 42 p. 386-91, 404-8, 424-9
  • Conway, Agnes B., 1911, 'The Owners of Allington Castle, Maidstone (1086-1279)' Archaeologia Cantiana Vol. 29 p. 1-39 online copy
  • Conway, Sir W. Martin, 1909, 'Allington Castle' Archaeologia Cantiana Vol. 28 p. 337-362 (plans) online copy

Guide Books

  • Thornton, D., 1987, The picture story of Allington Castle (Privately published)
  • McGreal, n.d. c. 1970, (Faversham)

Primary Sources

  • Maxwell Lyte, H.C. (ed), 1901, Calendar of Patent Rolls Edward I (1272-81) Vol. 1 p. 437 online copy
  • Rickard, John, 2002, The Castle Community. The Personnel of English and Welsh Castles, 1272-1422 (Boydell Press) (lists sources for 1272-1422) p. 259
  • 1897, The Great Roll of the Pipe for the twentieth year of the reign of king Henry II A.D 1174-5 (Pipe Rolls Society 22) p. 212 (expenses on throwing down (prosternendo) the castle) online copy
  • SC12/9/3 (survey 18 Rich I) The National Archives reference