Longtown Castle

Has been described as a Possible Timber Castle (Motte), and also as a Possible Masonry Castle

There are masonry ruins/remnants remains

NameLongtown Castle
Alternative NamesEwyas Lacy; Ewias Lacy; Newcastle; Novum Castrum
Historic CountryHerefordshire
Modern AuthorityHerefordshire
1974 AuthorityHereford and Worcester
Civil ParishLongtown

The castle and earthworks comprise a linear development running north west-south east and lie in four separate areas of protection. At the north west end is a keep, located in the north west corner of the inner bailey. The inner bailey, in turn, lies in the north west corner of the outer bailey, which is now bisected by the modern road. Some consider the eastern part of the outer bailey to be a separate 'Eastern Bailey'. To the north of the outer bailey, on the east side of the modern road is a linear bank, which is considered to be associated with the castle or with the associated borough. To the south of the outer bailey is an enclosure with banks which was part of the medieval borough. Beyond this to the south east are the earthworks of a ribbon development of medieval occupation. Separate from this, and further to the south east is a complex of irregular earthworks representing agricultural enclosures and occupation areas. Longtown Castle was built by Walter de Lacy, a lord of the Welsh Marches in the late 12th century, to defend the English borderlands from Welsh raiders, and to protect the adjoining colony town of Ewyas Lacy, later known as Longtown. The town of Ewyas Lacy was established by Walter de Lacy at about the same time as the castle. The settlement was one of several new towns in the area, which were usually sited adjacent to a castle for defence. The smallholdings, or burgage plots, to the south east of the castle, and fronting onto the road were occupied by burgesses who paid an annual rent to Walter de Lacy and his successors. Further income was derived by fees paid by stall holders at a weekly market, and two annual fairs. The triangular market place has been largely built over, and St Peter's Chapel, which lay in this area, has become a house. The castle and town passed from the de Lacy family in about 1230. The town appears to have prospered for a time, and by 1310 the population is thought to have been more than 500 people

Following the Black Death in the mid-14th century, the town's population probably decreased. By 1540 the declining town was known as Longa Villa in Ewias Lacy, no doubt because of its linear settlement along the High Street, and from then on became known as Longtown. The keep is a stone built circular tower, thought to have replaced an earlier wooden one. It provided living accommodation in times of peace and a last line of defence in times of war. Although ruinous it can be seen that it had two storeys above a basement, and is constructed of shaley rubble with cut ashlar stone around the door and windows. Inside the keep are the remains of a spiral staircase near the entrance and a fireplace at first floor level. There is also a well inside the keep and two projecting garderobes or lavatories. The keep stands on a large earth mound, or motte, about 6m high, built for defensive purposes and to raise the height of the keep so that it provided a good lookout position. The inner bailey measures about 20m by 40m with a bank 2m high and 8m wide. There are remnants of some of its stone curtain walls intact. These wall fragments stand to about 3m or 4m high, and would have replaced a wooden palisade on top of the bank. The inner bailey contained accommodation for the castle's owner, his servants, soldiers and livestock. Linking the inner and outer bailey is a stone gateway with a bastion either side. The gateway has a double arch and is about 1.8m wide. The ground level has risen over the centuries to make the arch now seem very low, but originally a horse and rider could have passed easily through it. Originally there would also have been a portcullis to defend the gateway. The outer bailey, measuring about 100 sq m, would, in medieval times have contained several buildings mainly used for storage. Earthworks thought to be the remains of such structures can be seen in the eastern part of the outer bailey. The whole outer bailey is defended by a bank and ditch. The bank stands to about 2m to 2.5m high internally and twice that height externally, with the ditch about 6m wide. There is a modern entrance on the east side, but the original entrance is thought to have been on the south side, where there is a break in the defensive bank, and a high inturned bank. The entrance to the outer bailey would also have had a gateway. To the north of the outer bailey, on the eastern side of the road is a linear bank, on the same alignment as the bailey bank and ditch, about 2m high and 8m wide. To the south of the outer bailey is another large defensive enclosure, about 160m north-south by 140m east-west, bounded by a bank between 1m and 2m high on its west and south sides, although the eastern bank can no longer be seen. This area, part of the original medieval borough, has a lot of later building development which has modified some of the archaeological remains, but there are some areas of open space where archaeology will survive. Adjoining the south east end of this enclosure are further earthworks, about 0.5m to 1m high, in the form of six terraces or platforms, each measuring between 20m and 30m wide and about 60m long, fronting onto the modern road. These are crofts and tofts, the remains of medieval house plots, fronting onto the road, with their gardens behind. In the centre of this cluster is a later rectangular earthwork, measuring about 38m by 18m. To the south east of these, some 230m away, are more earthworks, about 1m high consisting of agricultural enclosures and house platforms. Some suggestion of a possible partial use of this land is indicated by the field name Pigeon House Field. To the east the land drops about 4m to level out near the stream. There have been a number of excavations and archaeological observations at the castle. Excavations in the early 1960s took place within the castle bailey. An excavation by Jarrett and Jones in 1966 suggested that there was no ditch within 7m of the earthwork to the north east of the castle. Further excavations took place within the inner bailey in 1972, and of the keep in 1978. A watching brief in 1995 found a stone structure built against the outside of one of the castle walls, and at the same time part of the surface of the motte was examined, but there was no evidence of a timber structure. Evidence of the tower construction trench was noted in two places with ashlar walls set on footings of pitched and vertically-set rubble. It is suggested that the great tower had partially subsided into the motte. Since the 1980s geophysical survey has been used to study several parts of the castle and borough, but these have often been inconclusive. (Scheduling Report)

Gatehouse Comments

Phillips is of the opinion that the 'motte', recorded in the SMR, is a mound built around the tower and that no castle existed before the building of the tower in the late C12 or early C13. The form of the bailey is suggestive of Roman origin. Probably a late C12 replacement for the Pont Hendre castle built on an old Roman site or, just possibly, in a deliberate echo of a Roman style.

- Philip Davis

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

Not Listed

Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceSO320291
Latitude51.9565811157227
Longitude-2.98966002464294
Eastings332090
Northings229160
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Books

  • Brooks, Alan, 2012, Buildings of England: Herefordshire (Yale University Press Pevsner Architectural Guides)
  • Goodall, John, 2011, The English Castle 1066-1650 (Yale University Press) p. 181
  • Shoesmith, Ron, 2009 (Rev edn.), Castles and Moated Sites of Herefordshire (Logaston Press) p. 207-17
  • Prior, Stuart, 2006, A Few Well-Positioned Castles: The Norman Art of War (Tempus) p. 110-164
  • Phillips, Neil, 2005, Earthwork Castles of Gwent and Ergyng AD 1050-1250 (University of Wales) p. 246-8 Download from ADS
  • McNeill, T., 2003, 'Squaring circles: flooring round towers in Wales and Ireland' in Kenyon, J.R. and O'Conor, K. (eds), The medieval castle in Ireland and Wales: essays in honour of Jeremy Knight (Dublin: Four Courts Press) p. 96-106
  • Emery, Anthony, 2000, Greater Medieval Houses of England and Wales Vol. 2 East Anglia, Central England and Wales (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) p. 476
  • Salter, Mike, 2000, Castles of Herefordshire and Worcestershire (Malvern: Folly Publications) p. 48-9
  • Remfry, Paul M., 1997, Longtown Castle, 1048 to 1241 (SCS Publishing: Worcestershire)
  • Pettifer, A., 1995, English Castles, A guide by counties (Woodbridge: Boydell Press) p. 100
  • Whitehead, D.A. and Shoesmith, R., 1994, James Wathen's Herefordshire, 1770-1820 (Logaston Press)
  • Stirling-Brown, R., 1989, Herefordshire Castles (privately published) p. 00
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 1 p. 208, 213
  • 1981, Herefordshire Countryside Treasures (Hereford and Worcester County Council) p. 49
  • Fry, P.S., 1980, Castles of the British Isles (David and Charles) p. 256
  • Renn, D.F., 1973 (2 edn.), Norman Castles of Britain (London: John Baker) p. 231
  • Pevsner, N., 1963, Buildings of England: Herefordshire (Harmondsworth)
  • Toy, Sidney, 1953, The Castles of Great Britain (Heinemann) p. 107-8
  • Toy, Sidney, 1939, Castles: A short History of Fortifications from 1600 BC to AD 1600 (London) p. 97-8
  • RCHME, 1931, An inventory of the historical monuments in Herefordshire Vol. 1: south-west p. 182-4 No. 3 (plan), p. 242 (photo) online transcription
  • Oman, Charles W.C., 1926, Castles (1978 edn Beetham House: New York) p. 149
  • Leather, E.M., 1912, Folklore of Herefordshire (Hereford) p.2, 8
  • Harvey, Alfred, 1911, Castles and Walled Towns of England (London: Methuen and Co)
  • Gould, I. Chalkley, 1908, in Page, Wm (ed), VCH Herefordshire Vol. 1 p. 242 (plan)
  • Mackenzie, J.D., 1896, Castles of England; their story and structure (New York: Macmillan) Vol. 2 p. 111-2 online copy
  • Robinson, C.J., 1869, The Castles of Herefordshire and Their Lords (London: Longman) p. 97-100 online copy
  • Webb, T.N., 1840, Picturesque Antiquities of the county of Hereford. Engravings by C. Radclyffe (Cheltenham: George Rowe)
  • Storer, James, 1809, Antiquarian Topographical Cabinet Series: Elegant Views Objects of Curiosity Great Britain Vol. 6 online copy

Journals

  • 2004-5, 'English Heritage's Landscape Investigation: Longtown Castle' Castle Studies Group Bulletin Vol. 18 p. 89-90 (news report)
  • Shoesmith, R., 2002, 'Archaeology 2002, Report of Sectional Recorder' Transactions of the Woolhope Naturalists' Field Club Vol. 50.3 p. 400
  • 1998-99, 'Pre-Conquest Castles in Herefordshire' Castle Studies Group Newsletter No. 12 p. 33-4 online copy
  • Ellis, P., 1997, 'Longtown Castle: A report on excavations by J Nicholls, 1978' Transactions of the Woolhope Naturalists' Field Club Vol. 49.1 p. 64-84
  • 1995, Herefordshire Archaeological News Vol. 64 p. 43, 44-6 (plan)
  • Thompson, M.W., 1986, 'Associated monasteries and castles in the Middle Ages: a tentative list' The Archaeological Journal Vol. 143 p. 317
  • Hillaby, Joe, 1985, 'Hereford Gold: Irish. Welsh and English Land. Part 2, The Clients of the Jewish Community of Hereford 1189-1253' Transactions of the Woolhope Naturalists' Field Club Vol. 45.1 p. 226
  • Attfield, C.E. (ed), 1978, Herefordshire Archaeological News Vol. 35 p. 3, 8-10 (plan)
  • Shoesmith, R. (ed), 1973, Herefordshire Archaeological News Vol. 26 p. 6
  • Hogg, A.H.A. and King, D.J.C., 1967, 'Masonry castles in Wales and the Marches: a list' Archaeologia Cambrensis Vol. 116 p. 71-132
  • Wilson and Hurst, 1966, 'Medieval Britain in 1965: II Post-conquest' Medieval Archaeology Vol. 10 p. 199 download copy
  • Stanford, S.C.,1965, 'Archaeology, Report of Sectional Recorder' Transactions of the Woolhope Naturalists' Field Club Vol. 39.2 p. 156
  • Hogg, A.H.A. and King, D.J.C., 1963, 'Early castles in Wales and the Marches: a preliminary list' Archaeologia Cambrensis Vol. 112 p. 77-124
  • Renn, D.F., 1961, 'The round keeps of the Brecon region' Archaeologia Cambrensis Vol. 110 p. 141 and plate
  • Brown, R. Allen, 1959, 'A List of Castles, 1154–1216' English Historical Review Vol. 74 p. 249-280 (Reprinted in Brown, R. Allen, 1989, Castles, conquest and charters: collected papers (Woodbridge: Boydell Press) p. 90-121) view online copy (subscription required)

Guide Books

  • Remfry, P.M., 1997, Longtown Castle – 1048-1241 (SCS Publishing, Worcester)

Primary Sources

  • 1925, The Great Roll of the Pipe for the thirty-fourth year of the reign of King Henry the Second, A.D. 1187-1188 (Pipe Roll Society Publications 38)
  • 1906, Calendar of Patent Rolls Henry III (1232-47) Vol. 3 p. 42 online copy
  • Stamp, A.E. (ed), 1929, Calendar of Close Rolls Henry IV (1402-05) Vol. 2 p. 111 (1403 as defensible) view online copy (requires subscription but searchable)
  • Rickard, John, 2002, The Castle Community. The Personnel of English and Welsh Castles, 1272-1422 (Boydell Press) (lists sources for 1272-1422) p. 246-7

Other

  • Dalwood, H. and Bryant, V. (eds), 2005, The Central Marches Historic Towns Survey 1992-6 Download online copy
  • Morriss, Richard, and Williams, Robert, 1991, Longtown, Herefordshire – Notes on the History of Longtown or Ewyas Lacy, and the structural development of its castle (City of Hereford Archaeology Unit, Hereford Archaeology Series 104)
  • Bartlett, A., 1984, Longtown, Herefordshire, English Heritage Ancient Monuments Laboratory Report: Geophysic 5/84