Lanercost Priory–King Edwards Tower

Has been described as a Certain Pele Tower

There are major building remains

NameLanercost Priory–King Edwards Tower
Alternative NamesVicarage; Vicar's Pele Tower; Uttergate
Historic CountryCumberland
Modern AuthorityCumbria
1974 AuthorityCumbria
Civil ParishBurtholme

Vicarage incorporating former Guest House of the Outer Court of Lanercost Priory. Early C13 with additions of mid C16, and early C19 alterations. Calciferous and red sandstone from the nearby Roman Wall, red sandstone dressings; tower has gabled slate roof within parapet, extension has red sandstone slate roof with coped gables; calciferous ashlar chimney stacks. 3- storey, single-bay tower, to left. Ground floor double cross-mullioned window; blocked original window above; other windows are C19. Dogtooth decorated cornice with battlemented parapet. Short wall to left with blocked window is the remains of the rear wall of a C16 building which stood in front of the tower. Side wall has 2 blocked 2-light stone-mullioned windows, with similar window above. Rear wall has earlier stonework on ground floor. Projecting chimney breast has C19 2-light window on ground floor. Small window to left has been blocked internally, but retains its C16 iron grille. Tall first floor window to right and small square blocked window above. Built into the front wall is an inverted Roman inscribed stone LEG VI and sculptured stone head above right, is thought to be of Edward II. Interior of tower has cupboard in north-west angle which could be the entrance to the newel staircase; C16 moulded plaster frieze of scallop shells and mermaids, similar to plasterwork in scriptorium. C16 extension to right of 2 storeys, 6 bays, has C19 porch with chamfered Tudor arch, 2-light chamfered mullioned window above and moulded cornice. Central upper floor 3-light chamfered stone-mullioned windows with continuous hood mould, are original; all other mullioned windows are early C19 replacements in a similar style. Projecting upper floor chimney breast to right of original windows. Rear wall has single-storey C19 extension for its full length and 2-storey extension link with tower

Original central upper floor 5-light cross-mullioned window in moulded architrave with hood mould; flanking original 2-light windows. Interior of ground floor kitchen window is splayed with segmental arch. (Listed Building Report)

West of the church is a 13th century fortified tower with 16th century additions that is now used as a vicarage but was originally the guest house of the outer court of the priory. To the north of this building is a large open area known as The Garth. This area contains various earthwork remains of further buildings and other structures associated with the priory, however, the precise nature and function of these earthworks is not fully understood. (Scheduling Report)

This site is a scheduled monument protected by law

This is a Grade 1 listed building protected by law

Historic England Scheduled Monument Number
Historic England Listed Building number(s)
Images Of England
Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceNY555637
Latitude54.9659805297852
Longitude-2.69555997848511
Eastings355550
Northings563700
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis. All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis. All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis. All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis. All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved

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Books

  • Harrison, Peter, 2004, Castles of God (Woodbridge; Boydell Press) p. 67
  • Brooke, C.J., 2000, Safe Sanctuaries (Edinburgh; John Donald) p. 267
  • Summerson, H. and Harrison, S., 2000, Lanercost Priory, Cumbria. A Survey and Documentary History (Kendal: CWAAS Research Series 10) p. 44, 59, 64, 134-7, 183
  • Perriam, Denis and Robinson, John, 1998, The Medieval Fortified Buildings of Cumbria (Kendal: CWAAS Extra Series 29) p. 162
  • Salter, Mike, 1998, The Castles and Tower Houses of Cumbria (Malvern: Folly Publications) p. 70
  • Pettifer, A., 1995, English Castles, A guide by counties (Woodbridge: Boydell Press) p. 43
  • Cope, Jean, 1991, Castles in Cumbria (Cicerone Press) p. 99-101
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 1 p. 88
  • Hugill, Robert, 1977, Castles and Peles of Cumberland and Westmorland (Newcastle; Frank Graham) p. 113-5
  • Knowles, David and Hadcock, R. Neville, 1971, Medieval religious houses in England and Wales (Longman) p. 162
  • Pevsner, N., 1967, Buildings of England: Cumberland and Westmorland (Harmondsworth: Penguin) p. 157
  • Hugill, R.,1939, Borderland Castles and Peles (1970 Reprint by Frank Graham) p. 143-4
  • Curwen, J.F., 1913, Castles and Fortified Towers of Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire North of the Sands (Kendal: CWAAS Extra Series 13) p. 293

Journals

  • Baldwin, M., 1958, 'A note on the Conventual Buildings' The Archaeological Journal Vol. 115 p. 225-7 online copy
  • Ferguson, R.S. and Ferguson, C.J., 1866-73, 'Lanercost Priory' Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society Vol. 1 p. 95- (history) online copy

Guide Books

  • Keevil, Graham D., 2003, Lanercost Priory (London: English Heritage)
  • Moorman, John R.H., 1967 (2edn), Lanercost Priory (Brampton: John Moorman)