Hutton in the Forest Hall

Has been described as a Certain Pele Tower

There are major building remains

NameHutton in the Forest Hall
Alternative NamesHutton Hall
Historic CountryCumberland
Modern AuthorityCumbria
1974 AuthorityCumbria
Civil ParishSkelton

Fortified tower with large country-house extensions. Late C14 or early C15 for the Hutton family with early C17 gallery by Alexander Pogmire for Henry Flecther, further 1680's extentions by Edward Addison for Sir George Fletcher, incorporating parts of the medieval and early C17 hall; alterations of 1824-7 by George Webster, 1845 and 1845 and 1871 by Anthony Salvin for the Fletcher Vane and Vane Families. Tower has thick dressed red sandstone walls battlemented parapet with flat roof. Other walls are of pink and red sandstone ashlar, with parapets stone battlemented, under graduated greenslate roofs with large C19 bonded red sandstone ashlar chimney stacks. 2½ storeys over vaulted basement; rectangular tower with left 2½-storey, 5-bay classical facade and further left C19 3-storey, 3-bay tower and rear 3-storey, 7-bay wing, the last 2 bays in mock-tower Form; right gallery wing, adjoining the medieval tower at right-angles, 2 storeys, 5 bays with further tower 2-storey, 5-bay extension. Tower has C19 entrance within C19 shouldered-arched stone porch. 2-light C15 windows with cusped heads, and left stair loops. Left angle stair turret projects above parapet. Classical facade has central quoined-surround doorway, now French window, with keyed lintel, under large cross casement window in stone architrave within pilasters and bracketed cornice; central attic swag. Cross-mullioned windows, those on ground floor under cornices and first floor alternate open triangular and segmental pediments. 2-light attic windows in eared architraves, under pilastered parapet with urn finials. Left tower has Tudor 2-light windows, those on first floor pointed, all under hoodmoulds. Angle turrets, that to left with further circular angle watch towers. Similar windows in left return wall. Rear wing has sash windows in stone architraves, the mock tower has 2-light Tudor windows

The right wing is c1640 with a polygonal central open porch under a bay window supported by clustered columns. Segment-arched openings with similar clustered columns, now with casement windows. upper-floor mullioned-and -transomed windows. The battlemented parapet was probably added by Salvin. Further C19 wing has stone-surround doorway and 2-light windows. Interior has some original features including part of the angle newel staircase in the tower. Late C17 curved staircase with cherubs and aconthus leaves. Elaborate plaster ceilings, some C18, but mostly C19 by Webster and Salvin. Other rooms have C19 panelling, internal paralled shutters and C19 stone fire- places. (Listed Building Report)

it was formerly a strong place having a high tower well moated about with a drawbridge... but Sir Richard Fletcher... caused the moats to be filled up and made the seat very commodious and pleasant... his son built a spacious galley...' (Fleming 1671 quoted in Perriam and Robinson 1998)

Not scheduled

This is a Grade 1 listed building protected by law

Historic England Scheduled Monument Number
Historic England Listed Building number(s)
Images Of England
Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceNY460357
Latitude54.7140312194824
Longitude-2.8389298915863
Eastings346050
Northings535770
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Photograph by Matthew Emmott. All rights reserved
Photograph by Matthew Emmott. All rights reserved
Photograph by Matthew Emmott. All rights reserved
Photograph by Matthew Emmott. All rights reserved

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Books

  • Perriam, Denis and Robinson, John, 1998, The Medieval Fortified Buildings of Cumbria (Kendal: CWAAS Extra Series 29) p. 209
  • Cooper, Nicholas, 1999, Houses of the Gentry, 1480-1680 (Yale University Press) p. 225, 237-8, 279
  • Salter, Mike, 1998, The Castles and Tower Houses of Cumbria (Malvern: Folly Publications) p. 62
  • Emery, Anthony, 1996, Greater Medieval Houses of England and Wales Vol. 1 Northern England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) p. 212
  • Pettifer, A., 1995, English Castles, A guide by counties (Woodbridge: Boydell Press) p. 42
  • Cope, Jean, 1991, Castles in Cumbria (Cicerone Press) p. 105-7
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 1 p. 87
  • Hugill, Robert, 1977, Castles and Peles of Cumberland and Westmorland (Newcastle; Frank Graham) p. 96-8
  • Pevsner, N., 1967, Buildings of England: Cumberland and Westmorland (Harmondsworth: Penguin) p. 140-1
  • Curwen, J.F., 1913, Castles and Fortified Towers of Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire North of the Sands (Kendal: CWAAS Extra Series 13) p. 284-5
  • Harvey, Alfred, 1911, Castles and Walled Towns of England (London: Methuen and Co)
  • Taylor, M.W., 1892, Old Manorial Halls of Westmorland and Cumberland (Kendal: CWAAS Extra Series 8) p. 252-4 online copy

Antiquarian

  • Hughes, E. (ed), 1962, Fleming Senhouse Papers (Cumberland Record Series 2)

Journals

  • Cornforth, 1965, Country Life Vol. 137 p. 232-5, 286-9, 352-6
  • Baldwin, Mary, 1958, 'Hutton-in-the-Forest' The Archaeological Journal Vol. 115 p. 247-250 online copy
  • 1932, 'Proceedings' Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society Vol. 32 p. 176-7 online copy
  • Graham, T.H.B., 1930, 'The Huttons of Cumberland' Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society Vol. 30 p. 68-73 online copy
  • Graham, T.H.B., 1925, 'Vills of the Forest. Part II' Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society Vol. 25 p. 295-302 online copy