Denton Foot

Has been described as a Certain Bastle

There are major building remains

NameDenton Foot
Alternative Names
Historic CountryCumberland
Modern AuthorityCumbria
1974 AuthorityCumbria
Civil ParishNether Denton

Bastle, now a house. Dated 1594 on lintel and initials C.B. (Christopher Bell), with early C19 additions and alterations. Calciferous sandstone rubble walls over 2m thick, on chamfered plinth and large flush quoins; Welsh slate roof and coped gables, C19 cream brick chimney stacks. 2-storey, 3-bay original house, with extension of 2 storeys, 2 bays to left. Original house now has C19 2-pane sash windows with chamfered surrounds; central upper floor window has been recut through filled entrance, with reused dated lintel. Side wall right has filled ground floor entrance and small attic window. Rear wall has 2 small original first floor windows with original iron grilles. (Listed Building Report)

The two-storey building, measuring 13.0m x 7.2m with walls up to 1.7m thick at ground level, has been modernised and forms part of a private dwelling. At first floor level are three small, plain-chamfered window openings, probably original, two in the N wall, and the other in the E gable end (F1 DS 07-DEC-71).

NY 572623 Denton Foot The bastle stands in a hollow near the Castle Beck. Now modernised and used as a farmhouse; a reused lintel has CB 1594 engraved on it. A Christopher Bell had a tenement with 26 acres of enclosed ground here (Ramm et al). (PastScape)

Denton Foot is lived in, but clearly with very thick walls, two metalled windows and a datestone of 1594. (Site report from Catherine Bancroft Jan 2009)

Not scheduled

This is a Grade 2 listed building protected by law

Historic England Scheduled Monument Number
Historic England Listed Building number(s)
Images Of England
Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceNY571624
Latitude54.9543991088867
Longitude-2.67028999328613
Eastings357180
Northings562400
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Photo by Philip Davis. All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis. All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis. All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis. All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis. All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved
Photo by Philip Davis All Rights Reserved

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Books

  • Salter, Mike, 1998, The Castles and Tower Houses of Cumbria (Malvern: Folly Publications) p. 102 (slight)
  • Perriam, Denis and Robinson, John, 1998, The Medieval Fortified Buildings of Cumbria (Kendal: CWAAS Extra Series 29) p. 148 (plan)
  • King, D.J.C., 1983, Castellarium Anglicanum (London: Kraus) Vol. 1 p. 95
  • Hugill, Robert, 1977, Castles and Peles of Cumberland and Westmorland (Newcastle; Frank Graham) p. 82
  • Ramm, H.G., McDowall, R.W. and Mercer, E., 1970, Shielings and Bastles (London: HMSO) p. 77 no. 14
  • Curwen, J.F., 1913, Castles and Fortified Towers of Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire North of the Sands (Kendal: CWAAS Extra Series 13) p. 278
  • Jenkinson, H.I., 1875, Practical Guide to Carlisle, Gilsland, Roman Wall, and neighbourhood (London) p. 103 online copy

Journals

  • Ward, T., 1990 May, 'Bastle Houses of the Anglo-Scottish Borders' Fortress: The Castles and Fortifications Quarterly Issue 5 p. 35-43

Primary Sources

  • Graham, T. H. B. (ed.), 1934, The barony of Gilsland. Lord William Howard's survey, taken in 1603 (Feild-Booke yt explaines all the Map Booke for Gilsland taken in 1603) (Kendal: CWAAS Extra Series 16)

Other

  • Catherine Bancroft Jan 2009 pers. corr.