Saighton Grange

Has been described as a Possible Fortified Manor House

There are masonry ruins/remnants remains

NameSaighton Grange
Alternative NamesSalghton; Abbey Gate College
Historic CountryCheshire
Modern AuthorityCheshire
1974 AuthorityCheshire
Civil ParishSaighton

Site of a medieval monastic grange which was mainly agricultural in function until converted into a residence in the 15th century. The only medieval building still standing is the gatehouse, dating from 1490, which forms the entrance porch of the Victorian house which now occupies the site. The gatehouse is three storeyed and built of red sandstone with a stair turret to the rear left. The remainder of the monastic site was demolished in 1861 and replaced by a two storey sandstone building which forms the right wing of the present house. The building was extended in 1876. The chapel was built circa 1870, also in sandstone. The house was converted into a school in 1977. Part of the medieval boundary wall also survives, to the north and west of the site. The wall is built of sandstone rubble and stands on bedrock, on the edge of a rock cutting. It is thought to have been intended as a form of light fortification. The monastic site was granted a licence to crenellate in 1399, which was confirmed in 1410. (PastScape)

Not scheduled

This is a Grade 1 listed building protected by law

Historic England Scheduled Monument Number
Historic England Listed Building number(s)
Images Of England
Historic England (PastScape) Defra or Monument number(s)
County Historic Environment Record
OS Map Grid ReferenceSJ443618
Latitude53.1503295898438
Longitude-2.83417010307312
Eastings344300
Northings361800
HyperLink HyperLink HyperLink
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved
Copyright Dave Barlow of Abaroths World All Rights Reserved

Most of the sites or buildings recorded in this web site are NOT open to the public and permission to visit a site must always be sought from the landowner or tenant.

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Books

  • Emery, Anthony, 2000, Greater Medieval Houses of England and Wales Vol. 2 East Anglia, Central England and Wales (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) p. 569
  • de Figueiredo, P. and Treuherz, J., 1988, Cheshire Country Houses (Chichester: Phillimore) p. 159-160
  • Pevsner, Nikolaus and Hubbard, Edward, 1971, Buildings of England: Cheshire (Harmondsworth) p. 329
  • Knowles, David and Hadcock, R. Neville, 1971, Medieval religious houses in England and Wales (Longmans)
  • Ormerod, G., 1882 (2edn), History of the County Palatine and city of Chester (London) Vol. 2 p. 769-70
  • Turner, T.H. and Parker, J.H., 1859, Some account of Domestic Architecture in England (Oxford) Vol. 3 Part 2 p. 219, 420 online copy
  • Ormerod, G., 1819, History of the County Palatine and city of Chester (London) Vol. 2 p. 420- (tenurial history) online copy

Journals

  • Hogg, A.H.A. and King, D.J.C., 1967, 'Masonry castles in Wales and the Marches: a list' Archaeologia Cambrensis Vol. 116 p. 71-132
  • 1958 May/June, Cheshire Life
  • 1908, Country Life Vol. 23 p. 738-47
  • Ayrton, W., 1849, Journal of the Cheshire Archaeological Society Vol. 1 p. 115-23

Primary Sources

  • Maxwell Lyte, H.C. (ed), 1909, Calendar of Patent Rolls Richard II (1396-99) Vol. 6 p. 552 online copy
  • Maxwell Lyte, H.C. (ed), 1907, Calendar of Patent Rolls Henry IV (1405-08) Vol. 3 p. 160 online copy